Chess club – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 07:12:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-69.png Chess club – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ 32 32 Weltevrden Park-based chess club dominate primary schools section of Gauteng Chess Club Championships https://ajedrezenmexico.org/weltevrden-park-based-chess-club-dominate-primary-schools-section-of-gauteng-chess-club-championships/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 07:12:36 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/weltevrden-park-based-chess-club-dominate-primary-schools-section-of-gauteng-chess-club-championships/ Skillfully guided hands gain unbeatable positions by tracing masterful movements. Mzansi Chess Academy proved their mental power against the province’s junior chess elite on 12 November. Hosted by Powerhouse Chess, the Weltevreden Park-based chess club traveled to The Leonardo in Sandton to compete in the Primary School section of the Gauteng Chess Club Championships. Giving […]]]>

Skillfully guided hands gain unbeatable positions by tracing masterful movements.

Mzansi Chess Academy proved their mental power against the province’s junior chess elite on 12 November. Hosted by Powerhouse Chess, the Weltevreden Park-based chess club traveled to The Leonardo in Sandton to compete in the Primary School section of the Gauteng Chess Club Championships. Giving players a little taste of excellence, the tournament featured special guest GrandMaster Sahaj Grover who competed in a simultaneous exhibition challenge.

Founded as recently as September 2021, Mzansi Chess Academy is already establishing its dominance in chess circles. At the Sandton event, they entered two teams, both going through the Swiss format competition undefeated to finish in first and second place respectively. Team B recorded four wins and two draws while Team A picked up five wins and one draw, that only blemish against their Mzansi club teammates.

In addition to the teams that have left Sandton unbeaten, two of Mzansi’s players have spread the club’s name nationally and internationally. Already sending a marker for the future, U8 Daniel Badenhorst was crowned national champion in April and fellow U8 Kairaav Thorulsley won a bronze medal at the African Championships held in Angola in July.

Mzansi Chess Academy is led by seasoned player and coach, Matthew Jonker. Competing in his first national championships aged just nine, the 35-year-old former national junior champion has been a provincial coach since 2007 and has been a member of the executive committee and head coach of Johannesburg Metropolitan Chess since 2018. Matthew is also a FIDE, l French acronym for the International Chess Federation, registered instructor giving him the tools to train master strategists.

The club itself has just received its FIDE accreditation and is welcoming new blood of all skill levels to be part of its growing campaign to become the number one force in South African chess. Offering online and in-person coaching, the club is on the lookout for new talent and Matthew is determined in his ambitions stating clearly: “Our aim is to continue to spread the love of the game of chess. We are here to help develop and elevate chess in the country to great heights”.

Chess on the go at the Leonardo. Photo: supplied.
The undefeated B team, Dhiya Naidoo, Kupa Chinoruma, Meherr Singh and Johan Eapen. Photo: supplied.
The undefeated teams with coaches Benjamin Hercules and Matthew Jonker. Photo: supplied.
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Angolan chess club held its first meeting on Monday | Heralrepublican https://ajedrezenmexico.org/angolan-chess-club-held-its-first-meeting-on-monday-heralrepublican/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 20:10:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/angolan-chess-club-held-its-first-meeting-on-monday-heralrepublican/ ANGOLA – The first gathering of the Angola Chess Club took place recently at the Carnegie Public Library on Monday evening. Participation is free and players of all skill levels and ages are welcome to join at any time. The meeting will take place at 6 p.m. at the library on the first Monday of […]]]>

ANGOLA – The first gathering of the Angola Chess Club took place recently at the Carnegie Public Library on Monday evening.

Participation is free and players of all skill levels and ages are welcome to join at any time. The meeting will take place at 6 p.m. at the library on the first Monday of each month.

“Be the first to have fun!” invited the library.

Chess club host David Roe said five people had already signed up for the first meeting and it was more than he expected as those five people also promised to bring their family members.

Eventually, eight people showed up, from young to old. Ginger Smith brought her sons Elijah, 9, and Isaiah, 6, to learn how to play chess. The boys have said before that they mainly play chess online on their father Daniel Smith’s phone and he was the one who urged the boys to join the chess club, and they liked it.

“It’s pretty fun,” Elijah Smith said.

All the participants were at different levels of chess skill. One of them, Don Jones, said he used to teach others how to play chess, and for him the club was an opportunity to play live in person.

“I really wanted to play on the board instead of just playing online,” Jones said.

One of Jones’ students, Jan Taylor, said she started learning to play chess because she had a chess set from her late husband. She came to the meeting because she had just learned to play chess and she wanted to take this opportunity to continue learning.

“I have to learn the strategy better,” Taylor said.

Jane Minick said she came because she wanted to hone her chess skills. She was glad that her opponent at the chess club was good.

Roe, employed as a medical lab technician, said it was his father, William Roe, who taught him how to play chess when he was 10 or 11 years old. Roe liked the game because he thought it was a very good sport.

“I just appreciate that – it kinda reminds me of my dad too,” Roe said.

He said he had long practiced chess alone and online, both playing online with other humans and with a computer. He said he also went through many training materials available online.

Now, although he is not a professional chess trainer and cannot act as such, Roe said, he feels that after his training and experience in chess, he is confident that he can also learn to other people to play chess. Especially, given that there is no other chess club in Angola.

“I studied a little more myself and always wanted to go to a chess club, but there never was,” Roe said.

Roe finally realized that if he wanted a chess club in Angola he should go ahead and start one because if he was interested in one there might be other people interested in a club chess too.

So Roe contacted the library and the librarians were also excited to start the club.

“They seemed pretty excited about it,” he said.

He also said that he decided to do it earlier because it took time for him to practice chess and because he had more free time to commit to the club once. once her children are grown up and out of the house.

Roe said playing chess was conducive to learning and improving discipline, as well as teaching good study habits, because “to get good at chess, you have to study it” .

He added that it was a good sport and would be a rewarding activity for this generation. In addition, it will be a good opportunity to “bring people together to play chess”.

“Everyone is welcome, all skill levels and all ages,” Roe said.

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Checkmate: Interviews with the local library chess club by Elaha Moosa, Gumley House School https://ajedrezenmexico.org/checkmate-interviews-with-the-local-library-chess-club-by-elaha-moosa-gumley-house-school/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:15:16 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/checkmate-interviews-with-the-local-library-chess-club-by-elaha-moosa-gumley-house-school/ Simon Williams (a grandmaster) once said “The beauty of chess is that it can be whatever you want it to be. It transcends language, age, race, religion, politics, gender and socioeconomic background. No matter what your circumstances, anyone can enjoy a good fight to the death on the chessboard. I saw this quote come to […]]]>

Simon Williams (a grandmaster) once said “The beauty of chess is that it can be whatever you want it to be. It transcends language, age, race, religion, politics, gender and socioeconomic background. No matter what your circumstances, anyone can enjoy a good fight to the death on the chessboard. I saw this quote come to life in Central’s weekly chess club Ealing Library.Taking place from 1.30-3.30pm every Sunday, I had planned to visit after seeing the poster hanging on the library wall: a chance to explore this 1500 year old board game.

When I arrived, I was greeted by a multitude of chessboards and tables, all eager to watch a checkmate. However, while I waited for what I thought was the average chess club attendee – a wise old grandmaster – I was instead greeted by mother Enshul and her five-year-old son. His son was quick to mount a chessboard and fiercely challenge another young chess player. I marveled at the sight of two combatants in the joyous war called chess, especially at such a young age. This pleasant surprise made me curious to learn more about Enshul and his son’s journey with chess. When asked what she thinks is the most interesting thing about chess, Enshul replied that “it’s good, no language barrier, no age barrier, two people focusing on the game, no matter who is sitting in front”. His answer proved true as I watched children continue to play, strangers and yet communicate happily through chess as if it were a language! My intrigue grew as Enshul told me that she, her husband and son had recently moved to the UK from India and that her son had “adjusted well” – clearly carrying his chess skills over 4000 miles, ringing true to how universal chess is. Language.

Alongside Enshul and his son, I met a father and his 8-year-old son, Riyan, another avid young chess player. He started by playing with his father, racing against time as he calculated his next move. When I inquired about Riyan’s beginnings in chess, I found out that he started 3 years ago, when he was 5, just because they “had him at home”. Playing chess started out as a ‘weekend activity’ for Riyan but ‘he got good at it and I started liking it’,

Having frequented the club, I had my eyes opened to the range of chess players and that chess can be more than just a game, even for those as young as 5! I found that attending the club gave me a new perspective on chess, a game that I once thought was complicated and only for geniuses. However, as Simon Williams said, chess can “transcend language, race, religion, politics, gender and socio-economic background”. – a feat for what it is. It is obvious that our misconceptions about “difficult” activities, such as chess, can prevent us from finding a potential passion; instead, we should release worries and just be open to learning and exploring – just like Riyan and Enshul’s son.

Thanks to Central Ealing Library for hosting this amazingly insightful chess club and to everyone who enlightened me in this interview!

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Edinburgh Chess Club celebrates 200th anniversary https://ajedrezenmexico.org/edinburgh-chess-club-celebrates-200th-anniversary/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 16:02:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/edinburgh-chess-club-celebrates-200th-anniversary/ The Edinburgh Chess Club, the second oldest chess club in the world, celebrates its bicentenary today. Founded on November 4, 1822, over the course of two centuries the club has been visited by famous players such as Howard Staunton, Joseph Blackburne, Jose Capablanca, Alexander Alekhine, Anatoly Karpov and Veselin Topalov. Second in longevity to the […]]]>

The Edinburgh Chess Club, the second oldest chess club in the world, celebrates its bicentenary today. Founded on November 4, 1822, over the course of two centuries the club has been visited by famous players such as Howard Staunton, Joseph Blackburne, Jose Capablanca, Alexander Alekhine, Anatoly Karpov and Veselin Topalov.

Second in longevity to the Zurich Chess Society, founded in 1809, the Edinburgh Chess Club has an incredible history that now spans 200 years. Much of it can be found on the club’s website, which is well worth a visit. Here is what is written about the first years:

It started with 31 members, a number that grew to 50 in 2 years, and [in] in later years they discussed buying a house to serve as permanent club rooms. In fact, they had to wait another 97 years for that wish to come true.

The first entries in the cash book mention the purchase of candles and the payment to bearers of porters for the transport of chess pieces. The rent for their premises was £2 and 2 shillings. At that time, chess was largely a gentlemen’s game, and there are many representatives of the liberal professions and the military among the early membership rolls. Entrance fees were £3 3s and subscriptions £1 1s.

A list of dignitaries during the first century of the Edinburgh Chess Club. Photo: Ed van der Meulen.

Two years after its inception, the Edinburgh club played their famous match against the London Chess Club in 1824. (Plans to celebrate the 200th anniversary of that match in 2024 are underway!)

This involved playing a series of games by correspondence, with moves being sent by letter, which at the time was carried by horse and carriage – a costly undertaking since the “Penny Post” would not be introduced until 1840. Three games were to be played with all void games restarted, and two games would be in play at any time. The losers had to present the winners with a silver cup worth £25.

Incidentally, it was in this match that the Scotch Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Bc4) was first recorded, when one of the London players tried it. Edinburgh then successfully adopted the same variant in two subsequent games.

The following anecdote is priceless:

The moves were published in a number of newspapers and attracted considerable public attention and not little controversy when, in one of the matches, the London club attempted to pull off a bad move in a critical position, s even unsuccessfully addressing the postmaster for the return of the letter. The postmaster having refused, the Edinburgh club took the position that a move once posted was the equivalent of a play having been released and the move so terminated, and the game was ultimately won by Edinburgh.

The books about the match which were written later as well as the original letters with their wax seals which showed the trips between the two capitals are still in the club’s library. The match, which lasted around four years, was won +2=2-1 by Edinburgh.

The website further notes that the club has had homes in several locations around the city, including Princes Street, George Street, Queen Street, St. Andrews Square, York Place and Hanover Street. The current building on Alva Street was purchased in 1922 and officially opened on November 4, 100 years ago and 100 years after the club was founded.

In July this year, the 200th anniversary was celebrated with a game between the Edinburgh club and Schaakstad Apeldoorn from the Netherlands. Edinburgh narrowly won with 5.5-4.5.

Edinburgh 200 Apeldoorn
A group photo from the Edinburgh-Apeldoorn game. More information about this can be read here. Photo: Ed van der Meulen.

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The chess club celebrates the art, sport of the game https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-chess-club-celebrates-the-art-sport-of-the-game/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-chess-club-celebrates-the-art-sport-of-the-game/ Journal Staff Tanya Manus Neighborhood kids and teens who gather to play chess on Monday afternoons know they’re having fun. They’re learning a hobby they can play for a lifetime, and they’re learning vital real-world skills they’ll use away from their chessboards. The Rapid City Area Scholastic Chess Club celebrates its first anniversary this month. […]]]>

Journal Staff Tanya Manus

Neighborhood kids and teens who gather to play chess on Monday afternoons know they’re having fun. They’re learning a hobby they can play for a lifetime, and they’re learning vital real-world skills they’ll use away from their chessboards.

The Rapid City Area Scholastic Chess Club celebrates its first anniversary this month. The nonprofit club is open to children and teens in kindergarten through 12th grade in Rapid City and the surrounding area. The club meets from 4 to 6 p.m. Mondays in science rooms 120 and 121 at West Middle School, and meetings are free.

Beginners are welcome, as are students who wish to participate in chess tournaments. The club hopes to promote a better knowledge and understanding of chess as an art and an intellectual sport.

Every week a number of veteran adult chess players volunteer to coach young players at chess club meetings. Coaches include Nate Walstrom, who helped start the club and is its president. Volunteer coaches teach chess tactics, defensive moves and strategies.

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One of the coaches is Mark Falk, who has played chess for much of his life. He is a regular at chess club meetings and enjoys teaching beginning players and coaching champions such as Brogan McGrath.

In October, 16-year-old Brogan won the 2022 Junior State Chess Championship title. He and other players competed in five rounds of chess, each lasting two to three hours.

Becoming a champion chess player takes dedication, practice and hard work, Falk said. Brogan has been playing chess since he was 10 years old.

Brogan’s mother, Jan McGrath, said Brogan learned to play chess by reading the book “Chess from First Moves to Checkmate” by Daniel King. Brogan then taught his younger brother, John, to play. In addition to Brogan’s recent victory at the South Dakota competition, he won the South Dakota School Chess Tournament in April and represented South Dakota this year in the GM Arnold Denker National Tournament of High School State. Champions in Rancho Mirage, California.

“He’s very caring and he works very hard at the game. I think he spends time trying to learn from his mistakes. He spends time studying the game. That’s really the most remarkable thing. Most successful players work hard and their hard work pays off,” Falk said. “I think it’s rare to have a really strong player who hasn’t spent time working on it.”

“Brogan has the potential to be a very, very strong player in the future,” he said. “We have good players who are not beginners (in a chess club) and everyone who plays with these children has learned by playing with them.”

Falk is a retired attorney who has practiced civil and criminal law and taught business law and political philosophy. He finds satisfaction in teaching a new generation of chess players.

“I decided that working with children would be a lot of fun. I really like working with young people. I help them with their games and answer questions and give them competition – or they give me competition,” Falk said.

Younger players, who are in kindergarten and first grade, often don’t know the names of chess pieces or the basics of the game when their parents take them to the chess club.

“Meeting these kids who are so interested and excited about playing chess is what I love,” Falk said.

Chess instills life lessons as children learn to play.

“It helps build focus and I think it helps them to think beyond instant gratification. They start to think about the repercussions of things they do and things they encounter, and what that may mean. It gets them anticipating,” Falk said.

“It’s a fun game, so it’s entertaining. They derive satisfaction from competing with other players. If they lose, they almost always learn,” he said. “The biggest problem is following the rules. … It’s a friendly game, not a hostile relationship.”

Now 70, Falk said he learned the game growing up and became a more serious player when he was in college. He joined the Minnesota and USA Chess Associations, then joined the South Dakota Chess Association and competed in tournaments.

“When I was a teenager, I got a job. My boss liked to play tournament chess and he made me play chess every night. I don’t know now if I’ve ever won a match against him,” Falk said with a laugh. “It was the first time I spent a lot of time playing.”

“You learn more by losing than by winning,” he said. “For 99.9% of players, there is always the possibility of trying to improve and improve.”

Falk remembers coming into open world chess competition in the 1980s where “I got real rewarded by really strong players. It can be humiliating.

“It’s harder to stand out in chess than in some things. In chess you can get really good, but there’s almost always someone who’s a bit better who can challenge you,” he said.

The Rapid City Area Scholastic Chess Club is hosting a United States Chess Federation Unrated Chess Tournament for Veterans Day. The tournament will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on November 12 at the Bible Fellowship Church in Rapid City. Falk will be the tournament director.

Club members are also looking forward to the 2023 South Dakota School Chess Tournament, which will be held in Rapid City for children and teens in kindergarten through 12th grade. For more information on the Rapid City Area Scholastic Chess Club, visit rcscholasticchess.weebly.com.

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The triumph of Surya and Arya at the 20th Bangkok Chess Club Open 2022 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-triumph-of-surya-and-arya-at-the-20th-bangkok-chess-club-open-2022/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 17:45:12 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-triumph-of-surya-and-arya-at-the-20th-bangkok-chess-club-open-2022/ The Royal Bengal Tiger is back! Losing a match in a 9-round tournament usually means the end of hopes of winning a Swiss event, especially with such strong competition as the 2022 Bangkok Open. But Surya Sekhar Ganguly, the 2nd Grandmaster of West Bengal , proved that it was wrong! After losing his 5th round […]]]>

The Royal Bengal Tiger is back!

Losing a match in a 9-round tournament usually means the end of hopes of winning a Swiss event, especially with such strong competition as the 2022 Bangkok Open. But Surya Sekhar Ganguly, the 2nd Grandmaster of West Bengal , proved that it was wrong! After losing his 5th round match to Polish Grandmaster Klekowski Maciej, Surya fought back with 4 straight wins in the last 4 rounds!

The final round was a must-do situation for Surya – to win the tournament, he had to defeat tournament leader Bobby Cheng! Photo: Bangkok Chess Club

Faced with an inescapable situation, Surya played chess without compromise and won the final round in fine fashion. Thus, he won the tournament with 7.5/9! It was Surya’s first tournament victory as she traveled with her 2-year-old daughter, Arya. Arya even joined Surya on the podium!

Surya started as the 6th seed in the event, but finished in 1st place!

Surya on Arya, her trainer of 2 years

The coach refuses the student a handshake after the game! | Photo: Surya Sekhar Ganguly Facebook

On Arya on the catwalk with her

“Arya likes a lot of things, and one of them is stairs. She really likes going up and down stairs. In the stage, there were stairs. way I got this idea that I wanted to be with her on the dais when I pick up the trophy, she actually walked with me all the way, took the stairs, and then that trophy was 4 pounds, so on the one hand I have 4 kilos of trophy, and on the other side there was Arya – so I was doing my own gym there [smiles]. It was so nice to have Arya with me. I told you, she’s my greatest teacher. I played Sharjah Masters while she was with me, and the event didn’t go well. I was not happy at all, I really wanted to win a tournament with her, and play well. This time it worked!”

A tender father-daughter moment. | Photo: Surya Sekhar Ganguly Facebook

The impact of Arya’s presence on Surya’s performance

“There are pros and cons, of course I can’t say I sit and prep for 2 hours. My max prep time would be 1 hour on a very high scale. Usually I I’ll be done in half an hour to 40 minutes for an entire game. But the best part was, if something goes wrong, Arya takes it away instantly. For example, after losing my 5th round match, I think that if I was alone, it would take longer to recover, to get a good sleep and so on. But with Arya being there, it’s over right now. You walk into the room, and you can’t thinking about your game. So that helped a lot and in general I still say she’s my best teacher. I learn from her day by day. The way she looks at life, you know, I don’t can’t imagine. For me, as a parent, the only thing I want to offer her is to expose her to travel, and bring her closer to the naturally. I think it’s the only thing I can give him.

Have a good time with the elephants in Bangkok! Photo: Surya Sekhar Ganguly Facebook

If I can choose, I’ll bring Arya to every tournament. But of course, I would also like to have at least a place where I can prepare myself where she does not see me. Sometimes it’s not just about me, but also when I’m getting ready, she’s unable to sleep, because the room isn’t dark. It’s not possible to manage every time, but as soon as it is possible, I will.”

Full interview with IM Sagar Shah (with timestamp)

How Surya Ganguly’s 2-year-old daughter Arya helped him win the 2022 Bangkok Open | Video: ChessBase India

0:00 – Welcome and congratulations, Surya!

0:12 – Surya’s daughter Arya on the podium! How do you feel at this moment?

Surya’s coach is proud of his students’ achievement, waving the national flag! | Photo: Surya Sekhar Ganguly Facebook.

1:45 – A commendable performance at Bangkok Open 2022 – even after losing a match, you managed to win the event with 4 straight wins in the end!

2:48 – Bangkok Jungle Safari Adventures!

11:12 – What was your main objective in this event, and how was your mental state? Did Arya’s presence help you?

14:08 – On Surya’s last-round opponent Bobby Cheng and his approach to a must-win situation

17:54 – Surya Sekhar Ganguly vs Bobby Cheng, Bangkok Open 2022 In-depth analysis of the final round by Surya and Sagar

45:57 – The differences between verifying games with a computer and analyzing yourself

46:54 – Surya is in Saint-Louis right now for the Fall Chess Classic 2022! Do you feel a little sad that your family is not with you right now?

The Fall Chess Classic is made up of two 10-player Round Robin tournaments. Over the course of 10 days, these competitors will battle for over $36,000 in prize money and gain valuable experience in high profile events. Surya will face Vidit in the 1st round on November 2 at 11:30 PM IST! Find out all about the event here.

48:05 – What are your expectations in this closed round robin?

Surya’s favorite Japanese restaurant in St. Louis – Drunken Fish! | Photo: Google Photos

48:54 – Who is your favorite in Deathmatch 2.0 between Arjun Erigaisi and Gukesh D?

The two gladiators of Deathmatch 2.0, November 5 at DreamHack

49:47 – In your opinion, what is the difference in style between the game of these 2 youngsters?

50:45 – Even though Gukesh and Arjun will beat him in chess, Surya can beat them both in any other sport!

51:27 – It’s going to be a very exciting game, as both players evolve

52:40 – It’s very hard to say no to someone who says “Give it to me anytime in 24 hours!”

53:32 – Thank you and congratulations!

Top players praise Surya for his performance

Grandmaster Sandipan Chanda on his good friend GM Surya Sekhar Ganguly winning the 20th BCC Open 2022

“I’m proud that my coach and mentor Surya won in Bangkok” – IM Padmini Rout

GM Srinath Narayanan:

IM Irina Bulmaga:

GM D Gukesh:

MI V Saravanan:


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Chess club launches website, hosting second Roosevelt Chess Classic tournament https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-club-launches-website-hosting-second-roosevelt-chess-classic-tournament/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 11:47:23 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-club-launches-website-hosting-second-roosevelt-chess-classic-tournament/ The Scott County Chess Club recently made its internet debut with a new website and will host its third tournament in early November. The 2nd annual Roosevelt Chess Classic is scheduled for Nov. 5 at Alfreda-Harris Lodge at Roosevelt State Park in Morton. This tournament will follow the first tournament held last November which attracted […]]]>

The Scott County Chess Club recently made its internet debut with a new website and will host its third tournament in early November.

The 2nd annual Roosevelt Chess Classic is scheduled for Nov. 5 at Alfreda-Harris Lodge at Roosevelt State Park in Morton. This tournament will follow the first tournament held last November which attracted 46 players from Mississippi and three other states.

Chris Baker, the club’s founder and coordinator, said registrations were pouring in as the event approached.

“We are thrilled to be able to continue what I believe can be strengthened in a tradition of hosting chess tournaments in Scott County,” Baker said. “Combining player interest in the game with the natural beauty of one of our top state parks here at home is a win-win situation for everyone.”

The tournament will start at 9:30 a.m. and end at 5:00 p.m. It will consist of four rounds of play where players are grouped into three sections based on their US Chess Federation rating. Prizes will include trophies, medals and cash which will be funded by donations. There will be individual and team competitions.

Baker said support from local businesses has remained strong as donations make this tournament possible again and allow the club to do more each year to promote chess.

Players must be members of the American Chess Federation and can register for $30 until October 29, after which the fee will increase to $40. Spectators are welcome to visit and view the tournament free of charge.

“We want to make chess as accessible as possible to as many people as possible. You may have heard of chess tournaments on TV or other media, so we encourage people to come and see what looks like an in-person chess tournament,” Baker said.

Another development for the club is the creation of a logo and website launched on September 24: scottcountychessclub.org — making information about the club more accessible.

“It’s our window to our community and the world to tell our story of what we’re doing to advance the game of chess,” Baker said. “It gives all the information on what and everything we do and what’s going on in chess across the state.”

As part of the club’s branding, the club uses a logo designed by Baker’s son Aaron.

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Chess club draws scouts for merit badge https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-club-draws-scouts-for-merit-badge/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 11:53:04 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-club-draws-scouts-for-merit-badge/ Scouts from across Mississippi recently came together to earn their Chess Merit Badges at a clinic hosted by the Scott County Chess Club on National Chess Day. Held at the Forest Baptist Church Family Life Center on October 8, the clinic drew Boy Scouts from Greenville, Flowood and Brandon to learn about the game and […]]]>

Scouts from across Mississippi recently came together to earn their Chess Merit Badges at a clinic hosted by the Scott County Chess Club on National Chess Day.

Held at the Forest Baptist Church Family Life Center on October 8, the clinic drew Boy Scouts from Greenville, Flowood and Brandon to learn about the game and how to play it. Several of Forest’s Troop 63 scouts have already earned the badge.

Chris Baker, founder and co-ordinator of the local chess club, said the clinic was the start of what should become a regular activity for the club.

“We appreciated the opportunity to partner with BSA’s Andrew Jackson Board to host this clinic which we plan to host at least once a year,” Baker said. “The inclusion of chess among Scouting’s selection of merit badges is another indication of the popularity of chess in our country and the opportunities it creates to teach life lessons to our young people.”

Baker said turnout was low considering the number of other events taking place in the state this time of year on the same weekend, but official recognition of chess nationwide each year on second Saturday in October made the date special.

“We hoped that more Scouts would participate; but since it was our first time doing this kind of event, a small crowd was a good way to test the waters,” Baker said. “At the same time, we were impressed with how far some parents traveled to bring their scouts to our event.”

The clinic lasted three hours and covered topics such as the history of chess, piece movement and board layout, and the rules of the game. Baker, who became a Certified Merit Advisor this year, provided these instructions during the first half of the clinic. Baker’s son Aaron spoke to the tactics and strategy groups and the clinic ended with the scouts playing several matches in tournament format.

The Bakers also plan to attend the Andrew Jackson Council Winter Camp at Hood Scout Reservation in November to teach the game and help more Scouts earn their chess badges.

For more information, visit the club online at scottcountychessclub.org.

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Rich history and honorable traditions https://ajedrezenmexico.org/rich-history-and-honorable-traditions/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 21:11:36 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/rich-history-and-honorable-traditions/ On the rest day of the Candidates Tournament in Monte-Carlo, FIDE WGM press officer Andreea Navrotescu paid a visit to the local chess club. Here is his story. Today, October 27, was the first rest day of the Pool A Women’s Candidates Tournament. The real question is: what should you do as a professional chess […]]]>

On the rest day of the Candidates Tournament in Monte-Carlo, FIDE WGM press officer Andreea Navrotescu paid a visit to the local chess club. Here is his story.

Today, October 27, was the first rest day of the Pool A Women’s Candidates Tournament. The real question is: what should you do as a professional chess player on a rest day?

There’s probably no right or wrong answer to this question – some players would just relax while others would use the rest day to prepare even more. What I did today, however, was a visit to the local chess club (an easy choice since I don’t play). I discovered plenty of real gems for a chess fan, and I’m taking you with me!

My private guide, Jean-Michel Rapaire, who also happens to be the president of the Monaco chess club, explained to me that they have been renting out their current premises since 2008 and that it is a multipurpose space ( chess lessons are given on weekdays and on certain weekends, Monaco hosts French championship matches).

Once I entered the club, I was amazed to see all these relics, including framed photos, letters from the Prince of Monaco himself, magazines, as well as all kinds of chess-related objects. The real gem of the collection is Fidel Castro’s chessboard (!!) from the 1966 Olympiad in Havana.

Jean-Michel also spoke of the Monaco Chess Club’s long tradition of participating in team competitions of the highest level. Fun fact, Jean-Michel said that after the Monaco team won the French League in 2001, he promised the team to double the volume of the bottle of champagne… Which seemed to have worked wonders as motivation since they won again in 2002!

We can also thank Monaco for the creation of the European Association of Small Nations (ESNA). Since small countries like Andorra, Monaco, Faroe Islands, Luxembourg, Malta, Cyprus, Guernsey, Jersey, Liechtenstein and San Marino have active live chess, they participate in the individual and team championships of the ESNA. This tie comes from the 2013 ESNA Tag Team Championship and represents all member nations.

Monaco has always been extremely favorable to women’s chess, having organized different stages of women’s Grand-Prix (2015 and 2019). It seems to have paid off: the Monaco team have won eight European Club Cup titles and won the French Women’s League three years ago, in 2019. Players like Pia Cramling, Humpy Koneru, Les Muzychuk sisters (remind you of a tournament?), Almira Skripchenko are true pillars of the Monegasque team.

All we can wish for the players is to give the best of themselves in a place so steeped in history. The third matches of the quarter-finals will start on October 28 at 15:00 CET, so stay tuned!

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Boise State Chess Club Opens to New and Returning Players – The Arbiter https://ajedrezenmexico.org/boise-state-chess-club-opens-to-new-and-returning-players-the-arbiter/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 14:01:18 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/boise-state-chess-club-opens-to-new-and-returning-players-the-arbiter/ The Boise State University Chess Club makes chess accessible to new players and experienced veterans alike. Chess gained immense popularity online during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to security regulations, players had to stick to online games until recently. The on-campus chess club provides a great way to play off-board games. Ty Pfost, […]]]>

The Boise State University Chess Club makes chess accessible to new players and experienced veterans alike.

Chess gained immense popularity online during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to security regulations, players had to stick to online games until recently. The on-campus chess club provides a great way to play off-board games.

Ty Pfost, senior electrical engineering major and club president, re-established the club in September 2021. Since then, it has grown to over 40 members of all skill levels.

“We basically have everyone from all rating levels,” said Diego Cowmey, a sophomore in political science. “We have people who have never played before and just want to improve, and we have experts in their own right.”

The club strives to be newbie-friendly and hosts in-person meetings that serve as a social experience, which encourages new and returning members to learn, experiment and improve, according to Pfost.

Ashley Hardy, senior primary school valedictorian, says she enjoys spending time at club meetings for this reason. She mentioned trying crazy moves that often caused her to lose the game.

“I’m one of the players who play for fun,” Hardy said. “We help people learn by going through different strategies, talking about different openings and working on endings, and just playing together because you learn more as you play.”

The club is very beginner friendly. Pfost says everyone is ready to teach and play newcomers.

“We mostly want people to try the game and learn how to play because it’s intimidating,” Pfost said. “People always associate it with intellect and knowledge, but it comes down to practice.”

A common misconception about chess is that it’s “very mathematical,” as Cowmey put it. The truth is that there are a variety of ways to play.

[Photo of a chess board.]
Elise Ledesma | The referee

“For me, chess is like a good argument. You’re constantly questioning your opponent’s play and asking about their position and they’re asking about yours,” Cowmey said.

Cowmey is one of the most experienced players who loves competition. Recently, the club participated in Chess.com’s North American Collegiate Esports League (NACE) tournament, a competition for college clubs across the country.

Pfost says the club hopes to hold more online and in-person tournaments in the future for players who like to compete.

For now, the Boise State Chess Club is looking for anyone with an interest in chess. Members say one of the best parts of the club is the new people and experiences it provides.

“I think in-person games all the way [are] the best way to find fun in the game,” Pfost said. “Having someone to talk to, see their real face, comment on the game, mess around a bit is just a great way to improve, meet people and experience the game in a whole new way.”

There are many interesting stories about the history of chess which the members also share at the meetings.

“For example, there’s an opening in chess called the orangutan opening that got its name from a grandmaster who went to a zoo and apparently asked a monkey to play a move for him, and that’s how this opening got its name,” Cowmey said. said.

The future looks bright for the members of this young club. They’re excited to be here hanging out and playing chess at Boise State.

“On Friday night I could do other things,” Pfost said. “I could go to parties or hang out with my other friends, but I actually want to be home. [chess] club.”

The club meets in the Bronco Lounge inside the Student Union Building behind Subway on Wednesdays at 6 p.m. and Fridays at 7 p.m. and has a Chess.com page.

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