Chess club – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 12:08:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-69.png Chess club – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ 32 32 Oklahoma City chess club creates community for players https://ajedrezenmexico.org/oklahoma-city-chess-club-creates-community-for-players/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 04:22:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/oklahoma-city-chess-club-creates-community-for-players/ A chess club in Oklahoma City has created a community for players. From “The Queen’s Gambit” to “Checkmate,” the game of chess was put in the Hollywood limelight by the popular Netflix series last year. The connections to the game have their roots in Oklahoma City in what, for some, could be a very unexpected […]]]>

A chess club in Oklahoma City has created a community for players. From “The Queen’s Gambit” to “Checkmate,” the game of chess was put in the Hollywood limelight by the popular Netflix series last year. The connections to the game have their roots in Oklahoma City in what, for some, could be a very unexpected place. On a Saturday in December, between readers looking for their next good book and the buzz of lattes brewed in the cafe, you will find members of the Challengers Chess Club “It’s an old game. Its roots go back a thousand years. and its purpose is to protect your king, ”said Jake Williams, a chess player. The war game dates back to India around the 6th century, with six pieces on the chessboard to move as you please. “Arguably the most important piece in chess, the queen. As in the armies of a thousand years ago, kings are not allowed to fight,” said Williams. There are thousands of different ways to play the game, and even more possible outcomes. “There are so many secrets from the past in chess,” said Williams. As technology changes the way players move their pieces, the past competes with the present. “Computers have changed the way the game is played. is played. Now we understand the little benefits as they can decide the fate of the game in a much more solid way, “said Mason Tye, a chess player. Players of all ages, backgrounds and knowledge can For some at this Oklahoma City club, it’s not always just about the game itself. “It’s a game that millions of people play all over the world, so I think it is. something where you can feel a part of something bigger. You can be part of a bigger global community, ”said Williams. The game creates a feeling of being something outside of yourself. “It’s one of the few things that has really stood the test of time,” said Williams. It is a ship, historically linked to war and conflict. Thousands of years later, the game is used to create friendships and connect people across the world. “For me, it taught me so much empathy. You have to see it from someone else’s point of view,” said Williams. The Challengers Chess Club was formed in 2007 and members play in clubs and teams across the state. They told KOCO 5 that everyone is welcome. The club meets on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Chess club links can be found here: Facebook | Instagram | State Chess Association

A chess club in Oklahoma City has created a community for players.

From “The Queen’s Gambit” to “Checkmate,” the game of chess was put in the Hollywood limelight by the popular Netflix series last year.

Bonds to gambling have taken root in Oklahoma City in what, for some, could be a very unexpected place.

On a Saturday in December, between readers looking for their next great book and the buzz of lattes brewing in the cafe, you will find members of the Challengers Chess Club.

“It’s an old game. Its roots go back a thousand years and its purpose is to protect your king,” said Jake Williams, a chess player.

The war game dates back to India around the 6th century, with six pieces on the board to move around as you wish.

“Arguably the most important piece in chess, the queen. As in the armies of a thousand years ago, kings are not allowed to fight,” said Williams.

There are thousands of different ways to play the game, and even more possible outcomes.

“There are so many secrets from the past in chess,” said Williams.

As technology changes the way players move their pieces, the past competes with the present.

“Computers have changed the way the game is played. Now we understand the small advantages as they can decide the fate of the game in a much more robust way,” said Mason Tye, a chess player.

Players of all ages, backgrounds and acquaintances can play. For some at this Oklahoma City club, it’s not always just the game itself.

“It’s a game that millions of people are playing all over the planet, so I think it’s something where you can feel a part of something bigger. You can be a part of a bigger global community. “Williams said.

The game creates a feeling of being something outside of yourself.

“It’s one of the few things that has really stood the test of time,” said Williams.

It is a ship historically linked to war and conflict. Thousands of years later, the game is used to create friendships and connect people across the world.

“For me, it’s taught me so much empathy. You have to see someone else’s point of view,” Williams said.

The Challengers Chess Club was formed in 2007 and members play on clubs and teams across the state. They told KOCO 5 that everyone is welcome.

The club meets on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

Chess club links can be found here: Facebook | Instagram | State Chess Association

]]>
In the Formula 1 drivers’ chess club https://ajedrezenmexico.org/in-the-formula-1-drivers-chess-club/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 17:02:47 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/in-the-formula-1-drivers-chess-club/ But it’s not the only sport or hobby to benefit from such a surge. In October 2020, The Queen’s Gambit became a hit on Netflix, based on the 1983 novel about a chess prodigy, played by Anya Taylor-Joy, who becomes the world’s greatest gamer. This has resulted in a massive increase in interest in chess. […]]]>

But it’s not the only sport or hobby to benefit from such a surge. In October 2020, The Queen’s Gambit became a hit on Netflix, based on the 1983 novel about a chess prodigy, played by Anya Taylor-Joy, who becomes the world’s greatest gamer.

This has resulted in a massive increase in interest in chess. Retailers reported that chess board sales increased by up to 1,000%, according to the New York Times, while new listings on chess.com, one of the world’s largest online chess sites, were seven times larger than usual.

But it is not only the general public who entered 2021 with increased interest in playing chess, which, along with golf and padel, has become one of the new major hobbies for F1 drivers this year. year.

Ferrari drivers Charles Leclerc and Carlos Sainz Jr are the two drivers who have taken failures most seriously this year. As well as having excelled on the track as teammates, helping Ferrari take third place in the Constructors’ Championship ahead of McLaren, Sainz and Leclerc also became good friends off the track. This gives a touch of youth and freshness to the atmosphere of Maranello.

Chess is an interest that has always been with Leclerc, but as he and Sainz were looking for something to do during the quiet periods at the start of the season, it quickly became competitive.

“In fact, I’ve always been in it, I always liked chess when I was a kid,” Leclerc told Autosport.

“I think it was all the media days at the start of the year, we didn’t know what to do and I was playing chess, and he saw me and said OK, I’m uploading this.

“We got pretty crazy with it in the first part of the year. We played against each other and we never stopped.

It was a new obsession for Sainz in particular. “He loves his failures with Charles,” said Lando Norris, former McLaren team-mate. “I think maybe I beat him in the first game, then I stopped! I might be wrong, he would probably tell you that I’m lying …

“He and Charles played for hours and hours. I didn’t know he was playing before.

From thefts between races to between sessions in the car, and even during the long rain delay at the Belgian Grand Prix, Leclerc and Sainz were glued to their phones playing each other using an app.

And unsurprisingly, it has become incredibly competitive. In a video for Autosport earlier this year, Leclerc and Sainz debated who was the best in chess and won the games most often.

“Today we played on the plane, and it was 2-2,” Sainz told Leclerc. “And you didn’t want to play the last one. So if anything… I had the advantage.”

– No, no, replied Leclerc. “Do you remember the Spa? Sainz claimed he lost because he was so focused on the race.

“He’s very good at nighttime chess so every time we come back from races after 9pm he’s very good,” said Leclerc. “But from morning till night, I am much better.”

But Leclerc and Sainz are not the only drivers to have tried a lot of chess this year. Between sessions and various engagements at Haas on race weekends, Mick Schumacher is another driver who will typically be found playing the game with whatever spare time is available.

A chess board is now part of Schumacher’s essential kit to take with him to races, giving him the opportunity to sit and play to relax. Schumacher usually plays with Kai Schnapka, a physio who worked with Michael Schumacher towards the end of his F1 career before joining Mick in the junior categories. Schumacher also played a few games with Timo Glock, but has yet to play with the Ferrari drivers.

Yet it was only by accident that Schumacher really became interested in chess. “We have a chess board at home, we’ve always played it here and there, but never properly,” Schumacher told Autosport / Motorsport.com.

“We were very passionate about backgammon, Kai and I. And then we quit playing – we forgot our backgammon board, and the only thing we had was chess, so we started playing chess!

“Then for a while we were mixing chess and backgammon, and now we’re basically just playing chess. It’s fun, I beat him the whole time!

Mick Schumacher, Haas F1 team

Photo from: Haas F1 Team

Chess is something Schumacher has improved at over the years. “At the start of the year I was losing most of them,” he said. “Then for some reason I understood the game a little better and started winning most of it. “

This kind of mental improvement is exactly the benefit that Schumacher sees in the test. In May, he discussed the benefit of playing such games in an interview with GP racing.

“I feel like these games kind of brings the focus back, because you always have to be turned on with your mind,” Schumacher said. “In a weekend, I always want to be mentally prepared for any challenge that comes along.”

Also read:

Next year’s 23-race season is expected to give drivers more time on the road than ever before, which means more flights and more time at racetracks to fill in between their racing duties – and for the club. F1 unofficial but growing failures, maybe more members.

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P20k in play at Bayanihan Chess Club https://ajedrezenmexico.org/p20k-in-play-at-bayanihan-chess-club/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 09:06:40 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/p20k-in-play-at-bayanihan-chess-club/ P20k in play at Bayanihan Chess Club Through Marlon bernardinoPhilBoxing.comFri 17 Dec 2021 MANILA — IT WILL BE a very merry Christmas for the winners of the “Pamaskong Handog ng Bayanihan Chess Club” open chess tournament with 20,000 P in play at the event on December 23 at 10am Manila time virtually held on the […]]]>

P20k in play at Bayanihan Chess Club

Through Marlon bernardino
PhilBoxing.com
Fri 17 Dec 2021

MANILA — IT WILL BE a very merry Christmas for the winners of the “Pamaskong Handog ng Bayanihan Chess Club” open chess tournament with 20,000 P in play at the event on December 23 at 10am Manila time virtually held on the lichess.com platform.

The one-day tournament has already attracted some of the country’s top wood pushers, including 13-time Philippine Open Grandmaster Rogelio “Joey” Antonio Jr. and two-time Philippine Open Grandmaster Darwin Laylo according to Bayanihan co-founding president. Chess Club Dr. Joe Balinas and Co-Founding President Engr. Antonio Balinas.

The two-hour blitz arena tournament allocates 3 minutes plus 2 seconds of incremented playing time.

The champion will win P4,000 while the second place will receive P2,000. The third to fifth places will receive 1000P respectively.

The sixth to 10th will also receive P500 each for the category winners Lucky 20th place, Lucky 40th place, Luck 100th place, Top Iloilo, Top Negros, Top Antipolo :, Top Executive, Top Lady performer, Top Kiddie performer (12 years old and under), Top Junior (13 to 15 years old), Top Media Performer, Top Media performer, Top PWD (Men), Top PWD (Women), Top Senior Citizen (50 years and over), Top Kaunlaran, Top Arayat.
Special reward / token to those GM / WGM and IM / WIM who will participate and receive P1000 and P500 respectively.-Marlon Bernardino-

Click here to see a list of other articles written by Marlon Bernardino.


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    Corbin School of Innovation Adds Chess Club to Give Students New Opportunity | Local news https://ajedrezenmexico.org/corbin-school-of-innovation-adds-chess-club-to-give-students-new-opportunity-local-news/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/corbin-school-of-innovation-adds-chess-club-to-give-students-new-opportunity-local-news/ CORBIN – The Corbin School of Innovation continues to find ways to encourage students to get involved in unique opportunities, as the school has added several new clubs that students can join. “We’re just doing a lot of business here,” said Mark Daniels, director of the Corbin School of Innovation. The hope is that eventually […]]]>

    CORBIN – The Corbin School of Innovation continues to find ways to encourage students to get involved in unique opportunities, as the school has added several new clubs that students can join.

    “We’re just doing a lot of business here,” said Mark Daniels, director of the Corbin School of Innovation.

    The hope is that eventually all college and high school students of the School of Innovation get involved in a club offered at the school.

    “We try to provide unique opportunities for students who can get involved and hopefully develop an interest in,” Daniels said. “You want them to participate in positive activities, something that they can take with them and are interested in it. “

    One of the school’s newest additions is the Chess Club, sponsored by Daniels himself. As the school was closed during the pandemic, Daniels began to consider the possibility of adding a chess club to the School of Innovation’s growing list of programs.

    “I have a great interest in chess,” Daniels said. “I learned when I was 11 or 12, I don’t know how long ago, but I learned it and I always loved it. During the whole COVID period last year, I thought it would be nice to have a chess club, a chess organization, so I researched and there are regional tournaments, tournaments of State, championships and I’m like ‘that would be very, very cool for the students to have available to them.’ So, we just basically whipped it up.

    Last week, the school hosted its first ‘club day’ during which middle school and high school students had the opportunity to join any club that might have piqued their interest. Daniels said he had no idea what interest there would be in his chess club, but was happy to see 10 students attending the club’s first meeting which was fortunate for Daniels because he had five chess boards available.

    “I had a student who knew a bit about chess but everyone else was in the beginner category, which made it easier for me to say ‘OK, this is how we’re going to do it’,” he said. -he declares. “I just went through some basic moves, identified all the chess pieces and said ‘let’s play chess.’

    Although the original idea was for the club to meet only once a month, Daniels hopes the chess club can meet more frequently to bring students to where they need to be to compete with other students in the world. ‘other schools.

    “I’m hoping to get beyond the starting stage until they’re able to compete and possibly look at some tournaments that we might be able to take them to,” Daniels said. “It takes practice, but that’s the beauty of chess. It teaches you to think ahead, strategize, and plan, so that’s the great part. It really makes you think. “

    Overall, Daniels hopes that the students at the club not only learn to play chess, but remove the basics that come with learning to play chess.

    “I think with chess any kind of mental exercise like this is great because it lends itself to math and other areas of content that we teach and it does, you can just see the ‘mind work,’ he said. “You can see them strategizing. Where they can watch a game there are multiple games and a move you make prepares the other person for what they’re going to do.

    ]]>
    Lathon sees new chess club play a vital role in the West Point community https://ajedrezenmexico.org/lathon-sees-new-chess-club-play-a-vital-role-in-the-west-point-community/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 21:10:25 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/lathon-sees-new-chess-club-play-a-vital-role-in-the-west-point-community/ WEST POINT – Chance Dumas rested his head on his hands, staring intently at the board with a look as serious as any second grader can get. Playing black, he deliberately moved his bishop diagonally across the board to capture an opponent’s piece, removing his prize from the board and placing it to the side, […]]]>

    WEST POINT Chance Dumas rested his head on his hands, staring intently at the board with a look as serious as any second grader can get. Playing black, he deliberately moved his bishop diagonally across the board to capture an opponent’s piece, removing his prize from the board and placing it to the side, never changing his expression.

    If Harold Lathon’s wishes come true, there will soon be many more people, children and adults alike, gazing intently at the chessboards on Saturday morning in the Ester Pippen Boardroom at Bryan Public Library at West Point.

    Lathon, a basketball star at West Point High School (class of 1976) and two-time mayoral candidate, is very committed to the value of chess, especially to young people.

    “It gives them self-discipline, teaches them the consequences of their actions or inactions,” he said after the Fifth Street Bombers Chess Club’s initial meeting on Saturday. “Should I make this move; shouldn’t I be doing this movement? It is also an opportunity to prepare them for certain life skills: perseverance, endurance, concentration, even mathematics.

    Lathon almost sounds nostalgic when he talks about the West Point of his youth.

    “Church, school or basketball was my life,” he said, fondly recalling the stories of the hours spent on the Fifth Street basketball courts, calling it a ritual. passage that today’s youth miss.

    “The basketball courts offered a learning experience for those trying to learn the game, but also a very stimulating and mentoring environment for older players and adults who viewed the interaction on the basketball courts as more. than just a game, ”said Lathon. “Chess is quite similar to that.”

    Of course, even if the basketball courts were there, the demands of the game would mean some people wouldn’t benefit. Enter chess.

    “Since the basketball courts are gone and a lot of kids didn’t have the talent, physically, to play the game, but everyone has a mind,” Lathon said. “Chess is a sport. It doesn’t require a lot of physics, but the strategy is no different from soccer or basketball, and maybe even more.

    While the gloomy weather likely helped keep turnout low, players between the ages of 7 and 70 made the trip to the library. Lathon said he was almost moved to tears when he heard Herbert Gunn tell him how Lathon’s mother, a longtime teacher in town, taught him to read and the impact it had on him.

    Paulette Richmond Lathon taught for years at Fifth Street Junior-Senior High School prior to integration, then became the first African-American teacher at Central School. To date, Lathon supports a summer reading program at the library on his behalf.

    And he appreciates the role of the library in starting the chess club.

    “I am very happy with the partnership I have with Bryan Public Library to allow us to have the classes here,” said Lathon. “It really provides a good, clean, safe and healthy environment. “

    And the library is delighted to welcome the club there.

    “It is exciting news for our community and the Bryan Public Library to be in partnership to host these chess lessons,” said Bryan Librarian Priscilla Ivy. “By giving our children and our community this opportunity to learn an engaging game while learning important life skills, chess will be at the forefront of the development of our next generation of leaders.”

    A potential next generation leader is Naythanis Montgomery, a student at West Point High School.

    “We had a young lady here today, 13, and she said she wanted to play, and she’s an athlete,” Lathon said. “You rarely find athletes who also know how to play chess at the age of 13 in this community.

    “I was a little surprised, but she insisted that the most difficult games she had had were not playing football or basketball, but some of the chess games she had had. had with his brother. “

    It’s music to Lathon’s ears, who toured the room playing simultaneously against everyone who came to the library, as the great American chess master Bobby Fischer did. This seems reasonable, given that Lathon’s interest in the game began when he saw a copy of “Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess” in the library.

    For young Chance, the introduction was more direct: he is Lathon’s nephew.

    “When I came to see my aunt and uncle, I started playing chess,” says Dumas, 7. “I’ve never played before.”

    He said he liked it when his uncle asked him about the songs, and that day he always got the right answer.

    “It’s a pretty competitive game and I think I can get down to it,” he said. “I just like to play chess.”

    Lathon knows that whatever good chess can provide means nothing if the game is not enjoyed. The image of the game can be somewhat intimidating, but the atmosphere of the Fifth Street Bombers Chess Club should remove that obstacle.

    Lathon said, “We are just thrilled to be able to touch some of the hearts and minds of students and adults who may want to have fun in the game of chess. “

    The club meets Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon at the library, and although there is a break during the holidays, meetings will be held on a regular weekly schedule starting January 8. For more information, contact Lathon at 769-226-6486.

    ]]>
    Checkmate: the rise of the Carolina Chess Club https://ajedrezenmexico.org/checkmate-the-rise-of-the-carolina-chess-club/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/checkmate-the-rise-of-the-carolina-chess-club/ Peter Close, the president of the Caroline’s Chess Club and a junior at UNC-Chapel Hill, first became interested in chess while a student at Wake Tech and began watching live streams from Chess.com on Twitch. “It’s a very good game,” said Close, who transferred to Carolina last year. “And it’s beautiful because I always thought […]]]>

    Peter Close, the president of the Caroline’s Chess Club and a junior at UNC-Chapel Hill, first became interested in chess while a student at Wake Tech and began watching live streams from Chess.com on Twitch.

    “It’s a very good game,” said Close, who transferred to Carolina last year. “And it’s beautiful because I always thought that the smallest person in the world couldn’t beat the tallest person in the world, physically. But there is no physical barrier between two people playing chess.

    When Close started his sophomore year at Chapel Hill he wanted to dive deeper into the game, so he contacted the Carolina Chess Club. “There wasn’t a lot of movement,” he says. “I contacted the current president, who was involved in other groups, and he told me I could take over.”

    Today, the club has more than 70 members, nearly half of whom actively participate in the weekly online game due to COVID restrictions. In-person games – or “over the board,” as it’s called – have been a different story thanks to COVID. Carolina Chess Club member and sophomore Victoria Sagasta Pereira says the club don’t always stick to the traditional game. Sometimes they play as a team, where the club splits into two groups and competes against each other.

    “Or ‘hand / brain chess’, which is really fun,” says Sagasta Pereira. “You are in a team of two and you are not allowed to communicate with your partner. You have to say a song, then your partner has to decide which movement to make. “

    Carolina Chess Club President Peter Close performs with club member Victoria Sagasta Pereira on the steps of Wilson Library on July 30, 2021, at the University of North Carolina campus at Chapel Hill. (Johnny Andrews / UNC-Chapel Hill)

    Sagasta Pereira first became interested in chess in high school. “It’s a bit of a clumsy story,” she said. “I had a crush on a boy in my first year of high school. He was in a chess club. I considered learning to play so that I could join a chess club and hang out with him there, but never followed through. I went out with him in his senior year and I said, “You never taught me how to play chess!” He finally taught me how to play, but we broke up after that.

    She didn’t play much between high school and the start of her freshman year at Carolina, but by January she knew she wanted to join a club and socialize more. “I was like, ‘I know it’s COVID, but I really should be a part of something. “I was looking through the clubs and I was like, ‘Oh, there is a chess club.’ “

    She says, “This is a great group of people. “

    The club took advantage of Zoom by inviting world-famous players to speak at meetings. “I was able to have a conversation with Danny Rensch, who is the vice president of Chess.com,” says Close. “He is an international master.

    Close plans to invite more professional players to speak with the group this academic year. “We can get these talks from the grandmasters because they don’t have to fly here,” he says.

    Close also chatted with Duke’s chess team about establishing a friendly partnership and competing against each other. “We travel to Duke sometimes, and they travel here,” he said. “We’re going to have it so we can lecture and learn chess together.” It’s not necessarily just competition.

    While chess can be intimidating, especially for those just learning the rules, Close wants anyone interested in joining to know the club is all about having a good time. “It’s very beginner friendly,” he says. “A lot of people are afraid of failure. We’re here to have fun. We’re also going to have a lot of food. Food is important.

    ]]>
    The Chess Club hosts a tournament at Colleen’s, 10 players challenge a visitor https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-chess-club-hosts-a-tournament-at-colleens-10-players-challenge-a-visitor/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 19:00:12 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-chess-club-hosts-a-tournament-at-colleens-10-players-challenge-a-visitor/ It’ll be her move on Sunday when the Medford Chess Club reunites at Colleen’s in the square to kick off a simultaneous game pitting 10 local members against 11-year-old Kaiya Smits of Hollister’s Funky Owl Chess Club. The young player will juggle 10 simultaneous matches against the local players. “She loves chess,” said Elsie Smits, […]]]>
    ]]>
    Chess Club Arrives at Perry Public Library | Raccoon Valley Radio https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-club-arrives-at-perry-public-library-raccoon-valley-radio/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 11:43:02 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-club-arrives-at-perry-public-library-raccoon-valley-radio/ Chess Club Arrives at Perry Public Library | Raccoon Valley Radio – The Only One You Can Count On If the game of chess is something you might be interested in learning, the Perry Public Library has an upcoming program. Chess for Everyone: Beginners and Beyond kicks off on December 15 from 4:30 pm to […]]]>



    Chess Club Arrives at Perry Public Library | Raccoon Valley Radio – The Only One You Can Count On






























    If the game of chess is something you might be interested in learning, the Perry Public Library has an upcoming program.

    Chess for Everyone: Beginners and Beyond kicks off on December 15 from 4:30 pm to 5:30 pm Library Director Mary Murphy hopes this program becomes a weekly event.

    “We hope Wednesday afternoons will be chess time for anyone who wants to come and play chess. We did it with bridge a few years ago and we taught the basics of bridge.

    Murphy tells Raccoon Valley Radio that the lessons will be taught by David Oliveira who will introduce everyone to the game and teach them how to play. Murphy encourages everyone to attend.

    “Even if you don’t know anything about chess and just want to learn how to play, please come over. Looks like it’s gonna be a good time.

    There is no charge to attend the club and there will be the option to register for a weekly event at the first meeting. For more information about the chess club you can go here.


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    Stimulated by interest in “The Queen’s Gambit”, the Seattle Chess Club attracts new and seasoned players https://ajedrezenmexico.org/stimulated-by-interest-in-the-queens-gambit-the-seattle-chess-club-attracts-new-and-seasoned-players/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/stimulated-by-interest-in-the-queens-gambit-the-seattle-chess-club-attracts-new-and-seasoned-players/ FOR JACOB EMERT, the Netflix chess-themed hit drama “The Queen’s Gambit” was more than entertainment. It was an inspiration. “That’s what drove me to this, and I’ve been playing nonstop ever since,” he told me during a break at a recent meeting of the Seattle Chess Club. Emert is not the only one. The show […]]]>

    FOR JACOB EMERT, the Netflix chess-themed hit drama “The Queen’s Gambit” was more than entertainment. It was an inspiration. “That’s what drove me to this, and I’ve been playing nonstop ever since,” he told me during a break at a recent meeting of the Seattle Chess Club.

    Emert is not the only one. The show attracted quite a few new members to this venerable club founded in 1879.

    “’Queen’s Gambit’ has been a huge boost to our fortunes,” said John Selsky, the club’s outreach coordinator, as we chat and watch around 20 players reflect on their moves.

    Emert was playing mostly online or with his stepdad until he ran into the club. Gambling online was good practice, but “you care more when you’re sitting across from someone,” he says. “There is a significant difference between when you play online all the time and when you play over the board.”

    After abandoning their old location in Northgate due to pandemic closures, the club leased space at the Orlov Chess Academy near Green Lake to restart in-person games and other events in June. It hosts frequent tournaments both in person and online, but Monday nights are reserved for casual games. You do not need to be a member to attend these events; part of the club’s mission is to introduce more people to chess and give novices a place to hone their skills. Due to space restrictions, prior registration is required.

    This Monday, some people stick with an opponent, while others do a sort of round robin tournament, connecting with other players at the end of matches. I see faces tightening in concentration behind masks.

    Sometimes I hear a sigh or a whisper. “It did not go as planned,” laments a player. Emert interprets one of his moans to me as the sound of “I know it’s wrong, but I don’t know why”.

    After a match, players sometimes do an autopsy, describing how the game went and how it could have gone differently. There is no judgment, only learning.

    Selsky says he’s noticed an influx of gamers in their 20s and 30s, many of whom are tech workers new to the city. “They’re looking to make social connections and get better at chess,” he says.

    Tonight is Zoey Dailey’s first visit to the club. “Sometimes it’s hard to find friends who play chess who won’t just make you happy while playing,” she says. She had played a bit before the pandemic, but over the past few months she has played a lot online and watched YouTube videos dissecting strategies. Hours after the club reunion started, she won her first two games and animatedly discusses strategies with other players.

    Fred Kleist, a long-time member who has run the club’s tournament for 30 years, says a group started meeting informally even before the club was officially founded (it’s the second oldest club west of the Mississippi, after San Francisco). Why did he volunteer for all these years? “I love the challenge and I also love helping people play chess,” he says.

    Enjoying the challenge is a theme I hear over and over again. Chad Boey learned chess as a kid and then “didn’t touch it for a long time,” he says. He joined the club looking to improve and meet serious players. Now, “It’s fun for me. It’s like exercise for my brain.

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    The Recorder – Greenfield Chess Club relaunches weekly meetings https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-recorder-greenfield-chess-club-relaunches-weekly-meetings/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-recorder-greenfield-chess-club-relaunches-weekly-meetings/ Posted: 11/26/2021 17:00:29 PM Modified: 11/26/2021 17:00:12 GREENFIELD – The Greenfield Chess Club held its first meeting since before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, led by 90-year-old veteran chess master Herbert Hickman. Hickman and his daughter, Linda Hickman, retired director of the Montague Library, met a small group of chess players on November 10 […]]]>

    Posted: 11/26/2021 17:00:29 PM

    Modified: 11/26/2021 17:00:12

    GREENFIELD – The Greenfield Chess Club held its first meeting since before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, led by 90-year-old veteran chess master Herbert Hickman.

    Hickman and his daughter, Linda Hickman, retired director of the Montague Library, met a small group of chess players on November 10 at Greenfield Games for occasional table matches. While attendance amounted to a humble handful at the club’s first reunion, the quiet evening was of tremendous significance to Herbert, who has primarily played chess from a distance for the past decade.

    The Hickmans are hoping that the continuation of the meetings, now weekly from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays, will not only nourish Greenfield’s chess culture, but bring a human element back to the former player’s lifelong passion.

    Hickman began his chess journey at the age of 15 in Pittsburg, Pa., When he joined his high school chess club.

    “My dad was always smart, but he grew up in the shadow of his older brother,” Linda said. “Chess was the first thing he found he was better than his brother at.”

    He recalled that after winning a championship in Pittsburg at age 17, he competed in competitions such as the Pennsylvania Junior Championship, the Junior National Championship, the US Open Chess Championship and the Arizona State Championship, winning this last before moving mainly to play via postcard later in adulthood.

    “I’ve been playing correspondence chess primarily for the last 10 years or so,” Hickman said.

    He said he appreciates how the postal and electronic methods have given players “a lot of flexibility” to stay in touch with each other, an aspect of chess that Hickman holds dear.

    “You meet a variety of people,” he said of the play. “It is convenient.”

    Linda noted that the social aspect of playing chess was a motivation to revive the chess club, stressing the importance of connecting in person.

    “Part of the reason I wanted to bring him back was for socializing,” Hickman said. “With COVID, we haven’t been together for that long and it’s a good opportunity to connect.”

    Bringing people together wasn’t the only motivation, however. Linda also hopes that the Greenfield Chess Club can transcend antiquity and bring fun to a younger generation of players.

    “Beyond socialization, this is an opportunity to encourage failure for all ages once children are immunized,” she said.

    Calder Rossi, a veteran chess player who once ran the club, said the main reason he was excited about restarting the club is that he will be able to bring his 9-year-old son soon, as he was before the pandemic .

    “I can’t wait to bring my son here when he gets vaccinated,” Rossi said.

    He pointed out that for him, the importance of chess outweighs it being a fun game.

    “In my personal life,” said Rossi, “when I felt bad I would always come back to chess.”

    Hickman agreed, grateful the failures had helped keep his mind sharp.

    “It’s a very useful hobby,” he said. “It teaches people how to focus and really concentrate. ”

    Contact Julian Mendoza at 413-772-0261, ext. 261 or jmendoza@recorder.com.

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