Chess game – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:44:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-69.png Chess game – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ 32 32 Dan Smith takes on the Botez sisters in an epic game of chess https://ajedrezenmexico.org/dan-smith-takes-on-the-botez-sisters-in-an-epic-game-of-chess/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:44:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/dan-smith-takes-on-the-botez-sisters-in-an-epic-game-of-chess/ 07:44June 20 Dan Smith entered the BotezLive Stream for fast-paced chess action, the display of his chess abilities remains excellent despite the fact that he hasn’t played competitively in years. Smith is one of poker’s most renowned personalities, having won over $38,000,000 in live tournaments, and looks likely to increase his earnings in the future. […]]]>
07:44
June 20

Dan Smith entered the BotezLive Stream for fast-paced chess action, the display of his chess abilities remains excellent despite the fact that he hasn’t played competitively in years.

Smith is one of poker’s most renowned personalities, having won over $38,000,000 in live tournaments, and looks likely to increase his earnings in the future. Smith was an accomplished chess player when he became a full-time poker player, and it seems he still enjoys the game.

He recently accepted Alexandra Botezoffers to play a few games of live chess during a live broadcast, betting $20 each to liven things up. Results were deadlocked after four games, so the two agreed to play the fifth and deciding game for $50. Smith recorded a dramatic victory, promoting his pawn to rook rank and delivering a checkmate to Alexandra’s penniless king.

At that point, his sister Andrea, acting as an observer and mocking Dan throughout the game, stepped forward in an attempt to save the dignity of the Botez family. She succeeded, beating the poker pro in the final game.

As a result, the match ended with no winner on the table, but it was a great sight, so poker and chess fans won. It was all nice feelings, and we look forward to a rematch.

Also, it’s only suitable for a poker player to take on Alex in her turf after she did so during a recent Hustler Live Stream when she won over $500,000 in a match against poker superstars such as Tom Dwan and Phil Hellmuth.

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ANZ Premiership: Recruitment chess game heats up https://ajedrezenmexico.org/anz-premiership-recruitment-chess-game-heats-up/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:10:37 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/anz-premiership-recruitment-chess-game-heats-up/ The first of the 2023 ANZ Premiership player announcements has begun, with Pulse title-winning international shooter Joyce Mvula recruiting. Malawi International Joyce Mvula Photo: PHOTOSPORT Te Wānanga o Raukawa Pulse announced yesterday that top shooter Aliyah Dunn, a Pulse mainstay since 2018, is looking for new challenges elsewhere. RNZ understands Dunn was signed with the […]]]>

The first of the 2023 ANZ Premiership player announcements has begun, with Pulse title-winning international shooter Joyce Mvula recruiting.

Malawi International Joyce Mvula
Photo: PHOTOSPORT

Te Wānanga o Raukawa Pulse announced yesterday that top shooter Aliyah Dunn, a Pulse mainstay since 2018, is looking for new challenges elsewhere.

RNZ understands Dunn was signed with the Tactix, as they parted ways with goalkeeper Ellie Bird, who had been with the team since 2017.

It is understood that the Tactix, who finished bottom this year, have also signed a midfielder from the Roses of England, who will fill the attacking role on the starting wing.

With his high volume and accuracy, Dunn has topped shooting stats this year and the Pulse would have been keen to lock down a player who has a similar presence.

Mvula, 28, has been plying her trade in the British Super League since 2017 for the Manchester Thunder, where she played a key role in the team’s unbeaten run to the title this year.

Over the past three years, she has achieved a 91% success rate from under the hoop.

The 1.85m Mvula is also a star of the Malawi international team and has competed at the World Cup and Commonwealth Games.

Midfielder Fa’amu Ioane also joined Pulse from Northern Mystics, where her career at elite level began in 2016.

The 26-year-old has mainly played wing defense but has struggled to get court time this year.

The core of this year’s Pulse side has been retained.

Rangy defender Parris Mason and exciting midfielder Ainsleyana Puleiata make the leap from sister team Manawa, who won the National Netball League this year.

A bolter straight out of school on the 2021 Pulse squad, 19-year-old Mason returned to the Manawa squad this year to continue developing her game while also being a Pulse sparring partner.

Puleiata, 21, has previously served as a Pulse sparring partner while adding cover this year for the Pulse.

Pulse coach Yvette McCausland-Durie said she was happy to have a core of six players back.

“Joyce and Fa’amu are experienced and established performers who will add variety and options for us. They are exciting additions and we look forward to what they can bring.”

Courtney Elliot, one of Pulse’s alternates this season, will return next year as a training partner.

The franchise will support Paris Lokotui and Binnian Hunt in their rehabilitation from ACL injuries and will be back in the domestic league.

All six ANZ Premiership franchises must have their rosters complete by July 8.

Franchises cannot start approaching players from other teams until a week after the ANZ Premiership Grand Final, but players themselves can engage in discussions with other franchises.

Pulse 2023 Team:

Maddy Gordon, Fa’amu Ioane, Kelly Jury, Kristiana Manu’a, Parris Mason, Tiana Metuarau, Joyce Mvula, Ainsleyana Puleiata, Whitney Souness, Amelia Walmsley.

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The Queen’s Gambit is now a chess game you can only play on Netflix https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-queens-gambit-is-now-a-chess-game-you-can-only-play-on-netflix/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 18:02:17 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-queens-gambit-is-now-a-chess-game-you-can-only-play-on-netflix/ 2020 saw Netflix series The Queen’s Gambit (opens in a new tab) becoming something of a lockdown hit: The show, based on a 1981 novel of the same name, follows chess prodigy Beth Harmon on her journey from playing in basements to playing world’s best in the Soviet Union. Now, Netflix has decided to belatedly […]]]>

2020 saw Netflix series The Queen’s Gambit (opens in a new tab) becoming something of a lockdown hit: The show, based on a 1981 novel of the same name, follows chess prodigy Beth Harmon on her journey from playing in basements to playing world’s best in the Soviet Union. Now, Netflix has decided to belatedly capitalize on the show’s popularity by…creating a Netflix-only chess client.

The Queen’s Gambit Chess is a strange old bird. It was unforgettably introduced by Geoff Keighley as “not just a chessboard”, because of course it’s not like chess was a good game per se, but he later overcame that by selling some of the slots ambitious that you can play, including… the orphanage in which Beth grew up and learned the game.

A chessboard in The Queen's Gambit Chess.

(Image credit: Netflix Games)

Video games! To be serious for a moment, this is a very interesting move by Netflix. The game includes replays of some of the show’s encounters with great opponents, chess puzzles, chess lessons, and most notably online play. It will be part of any standard Netflix account and thanks to the popularity of the show is sure to attract a sizable player base to the game of kings.

The mark here looks like a Trojan horse. The trailer makes it clear that the game includes a whole bunch of different ways to visually play the game and a wide selection of chess games to unlock. It’s not like chess is underserved online, there are a bunch of fantastic options out there with large player bases, but the Netflix ecosystem is so huge it could easily carve out a sizeable niche among gamers. who would never have dreamed of searching for something like chess.com.

A chessboard in The Queen's Gambit Chess.

(Image credit: Netflix Games)

“What happened recently after the phenomenal success of The Queen’s Gambit shows that the passion for chess is still there,” former world champion Garry Kasparov told us last year. (opens in a new tab). “Unlike other games, chess has survived for about 1,500 years. And the game has always adapted to the demands of modern times.”

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CLOSE-IN: T20 becomes similar to a game of chess https://ajedrezenmexico.org/close-in-t20-becomes-similar-to-a-game-of-chess/ Sat, 28 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/close-in-t20-becomes-similar-to-a-game-of-chess/ By Yajurvindra Singh May 28: Cricket’s T20 format was an attempt to liven up the game and make it viewer friendly. It turned out to be a success and a lifeline for the game of cricket. Every game around the world is filled with loud, active, boisterous spectators brimming with enthusiastic energy. It is […]]]>

By Yajurvindra Singh

May 28: Cricket’s T20 format was an attempt to liven up the game and make it viewer friendly. It turned out to be a success and a lifeline for the game of cricket. Every game around the world is filled with loud, active, boisterous spectators brimming with enthusiastic energy. It is reminiscent of the Colosseum, where gladiators fought for their lives and prestige during the days of the Roman Empire.

T20 cricket evokes a very similar attachment and emotion among the crowd, however, without the true bloodthirsty response of old.

The early days of T20 cricket were seen as a slam-bang version, in which thoughtless cross-beating and stroke-playing were the norm to follow. Yuvraj Singh, hitting 6 sixes off a Stuart Broad, in the first-ever T20 World Cup, was the epitome of every hitter’s desire. India winning the Cup in 2007 was just the tonic the doctor prescribed to energize the Indian fans.

The Indian Premier League (IPL) in 2008 had skeptics who felt cricket was being sacrificed for commercial gains and the sport would lose its character and the values ​​it represents. The game of a gentleman who reveled in artistic stroke-play would breed fags who would do well to kill flies. A brilliant 158 ​​from New Zealand’s Brendon McCullum on just 73 balls for the Kolkata Knight Riders in the inaugural IPL game in 2008 was a revelation. He played correct, conventional and courageous cricket shots, which not only made his innings admired, but also became the precursor for others to follow. It gave just the necessary boost not only to the T20 format but also to the most lucrative cricket league in the world, the IPL.

Chris Gayle, the powerful and strong West Indian cricket star with his vigorous hits, became the IPL superstar and the one every batter wanted to emulate. Cricket has evolved from a game of a number of runs scored to strike rates, indicating the number of balls faced to get them.

So cricket came to life with batters ready to strike and attack. The fast pace of the game has forced cricketers to become more agile, fit and thus look like well-sculpted athletes. Cameras on every corner of the pitch highlighted every move they made and slow-motion replays became a luxury to enjoy. A cricket match has blossomed into a mysterious story with an uncertain ending, while spawning heroes and villains as it progresses – entertainment the family can join in on.

The slam-bang approach of the original T20 theory gradually gave way to a more planned and strategy-oriented concept. Players, matches and conditions were analyzed to the ultimate degree by IT professionals and teams of trained support staff, using data and results extensively for their use.

T20 cricket has gradually changed by leaps and bounds. It became a game of chess between two teams, each making moves and thinking ahead. Yuzvendra Chahal, the cunning leg-spinner and renowned chess player himself, in a recent interview talked about how he studies the beater to surpass him. Interestingly, the game has become a mental battle between batter and bowler. Each tries to read the other to outsmart each other.

The batsman gets an idea of ​​what the bowler has in mind by the pitch placement set up. However, many bowlers have foiled the batsman by playing a dummy move. A batter still has an advantage with bowlers having a width restriction as well as a defensive players restriction outside the 30-yard circle. Bowlers have also innovated in a major way. The variety of deliveries that many have now adept at doing is quite remarkable and innovative.

Cricket has never seen such a transformation as what it is going through over the past decade. The innovative and unimaginable strokes of batters and the varieties of variable deliveries produced by bowlers have made cricket a game very different from that of the past.

The board is so prominent in today’s world of T20 cricket. Many pawns are sacrificed and rooks, bishops and knights are moved to strategize victory. A queen is an all-around player who could, through batting or bowling, change the complexion of the game. The king is the citadel that every franchise team protects, through planned strategies and thoughtful moves to avoid a checkmate. .

Cricket eventually became a game of brains as well as strength – a game that requires a cricketer to think right and act with strength. The T20 format totally revolutionized cricket for years to come.

It feels like Test cricket will never be the same again. Modern cricketers are products of the rapidly changing digital world, in which speed is important for progress. Latecomers will be left behind.

Chess also has a “fast” version. T10 cricket could be next to follow. One then wonders what new innovation will emerge.

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Hong Kong: Pearl of the Orient or Pawn in Chinese Chess?, By Osmund Agbo https://ajedrezenmexico.org/hong-kong-pearl-of-the-orient-or-pawn-in-chinese-chess-by-osmund-agbo/ Fri, 27 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/hong-kong-pearl-of-the-orient-or-pawn-in-chinese-chess-by-osmund-agbo/ It remains to be seen whether Hong Kong will regain its former glory as the Pearl of the Orient or continue to be a pawn in the chess game of China and other world powers. But one thing is clear, Hong Kong’s new leader is largely responsible for stifling dissent in an iconic city once […]]]>

It remains to be seen whether Hong Kong will regain its former glory as the Pearl of the Orient or continue to be a pawn in the chess game of China and other world powers. But one thing is clear, Hong Kong’s new leader is largely responsible for stifling dissent in an iconic city once known for its vibrant civil society and freewheeling press.

Just two weeks ago, precisely on Sunday May 8, John Lee was “elected” as the fifth Chief Executive of Hong Kong, as the leader of this island territory in China is called. This was an “election” in which Mr Lee was the only candidate and we were told he won over 99% of the votes cast by members of the election committee in a secret ballot. But China is not fooling anyone. The caricature of Hong Kong’s largely pro-Chinese election committee was just an elaborate ploy to present Beijing’s choice to the world.

Mr. Lee’s pedigree made him an ideal candidate to pursue China’s intentions in Hong Kong. After joining the police at the age of 19, he rose through the ranks, eventually becoming security secretary in 2017. It was in this position that he led the heavy-handed crackdown on anti-government protests that rocked the city in 2019 and many believe that his “election” is a reward for doing the bidding in Beijing at the time.

Before the arrival of the British, the area now called Hong Kong was a small fishing community located on the southern coast of China and surrounded on all sides by the South China Sea, except in the north. The Spaniards who first visited the area named it Ladrones, meaning an island of thieves, fitting Hong Kong’s bad reputation at the time as a pirate’s paradise. But it is also where the British came to buy certain Chinese products, such as porcelain, tea and silk.

The Chinese, on the other hand, had little or no interest in European manufactured goods. So, over time, Britain found itself facing a huge trade deficit with China. Britain decided that the best way to remedy this imbalance was to smuggle opium into Hong Kong.

This decision of course reversed the trade imbalance, but came with a high price for China, which had to deal with an epidemic of opium addicts. Enraged by this development, China went ahead and destroyed British opium and refused to pay any compensation for it. This would eventually lead to the First Opium War which ended in 1842 in favor of Britain. China was forced to cede Hong Kong Island to Britain as spoils of war, under the terms of the Treaty of Nanjing, signed by the two nations in 1898. China would regain control of Hong Kong after eighty -nineteen years, whose lease expired on July 1, 1997 at midnight.

Under British control, Hong Kong became completely westernized in almost every facet of life, from education to culture, and even adopted the Christian religion. The island flourished as mainland China faced periods of great instability. During the Second World War, the island was invaded by the Japanese who occupied it for three years. This was later ceded to the British after Japan’s defeat by Allied forces.

In all of this, Hong Kongers have become helpless against a belligerent China. The media, unions, political parties and human rights groups have all been subjected to intense government censorship. Many pro-democracy activists have been arrested and are in detention on charges bordering on treason.

Hong Kong operates a large capitalist service economy, marked by low taxation and free trade, which partly explains why it has become the city with the highest concentration of ultra-wealthy individuals, more than any city ​​in the world. The Hong Kong dollar is also the eighth most traded currency in the world.

The main difference between mainland China and Hong Kong is the system of government. The former is communist and controlled by a single party, while Hong Kong has what is called limited democracy. While the president of China is the head of states that governs both places, each still has its own head of government. The Prime Minister in the case of Mainland China and the Director General at the head of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

When the lease expired in 1997, China demanded the repossession of Hong Kong. In an attempt to reassure the international community and the people of Hong Kong, China’s Supreme Leader Deng Xiaoping and Britain’s Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher agreed to implement what has been called the “one China, two systems” policy. This meant that Beijing would assume sovereignty, but Hong Kong would retain its rule of law and capitalist ways for 50 years, with its own economy, currency, etc.

Implementation of the policy, however, has remained problematic, as China continues to aggressively assert its power, relentlessly interfering with and dictating Hong Kong’s political direction and governance. The political rules were established to ensure that pro-Beijing forces control the local legislature, known as Lego. But what’s even more baffling to Hong Kongers is that no one can guarantee what would happen to Hong Kong the day after the handover ends in 2047.

In all of this, Hong Kongers have become helpless against a belligerent China. The media, unions, political parties and human rights groups have all been subjected to intense government censorship. Many pro-democracy activists have been arrested and are in detention on charges bordering on treason.

China, once considered a poor cousin, has now become the world’s second-largest economy and on the fastest road to first place. With this in mind, many world leaders and CEOs of multinational corporations are scrambling to please China and hopefully gain access to its estimated consumer market of 1.4 billion people, while turning a blind eye to the atrocities that she commits.

The fate of Hong Kong today should offer a lesson in sobriety to Biafran secessionists who are confident that in a war with Nigeria the international community will somehow rally to the rescue and that the pendulum of victory will turn in their favor. Such a notion is rooted primarily in the belief that the Ndigbo are fighting a just and worthy cause, which is indeed true. But the reality is that having such hope is like living in a lunatic’s paradise.

One of the biggest disappointments on the whole Hong Kong issue has been Britain’s silence, or at best the lukewarm responses to China’s dominant influence, which is worse than silence. Former British Prime Minister Sir John Major promised before the transfer that Britain would do everything possible and use its influence to defend Hong Kong and its freedoms, but that is not happening now. British businessmen just want things to continue as usual, in order to maintain good relations with China. They want the Hong Kong protesters to go home and not be seen again, which seems to be in the political interest of the British government. The simple truth is that money rules and China has plenty of it.

The Americans, who pride themselves on being the defenders of democracy, do no better. When China’s top internet regulator visited Facebook’s CEO in Silicon Valley, Mark Zuckerberg reportedly kept a copy of a book containing selected speeches by President Xi Jinping on his desk. Even former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg funded Harvard University to establish a research center in Shanghai. Everyone literally bends over backwards to please the Chinese in order to get a slice of the pie.

The fate of Hong Kong today should offer a lesson in sobriety to Biafran secessionists who are confident that in a war with Nigeria the international community will somehow rally to the rescue and that the pendulum of victory will turn in their favor. Such a notion is rooted primarily in the belief that the Ndigbo are fighting a just and worthy cause, which is indeed true. But the reality is that having such hope is like living in a lunatic’s paradise. Nations are primarily looking for what is in their own interest, rather than whether certain actions would earn them moral points.

On July 1, when John Lee begins his five-year term, replacing outgoing chief executive Carrie Lam, he will become the first former police officer to lead Hong Kong in more than a century. He plans to push through a series of new laws on secession, treason, sedition and subversion, known collectively as Article 23, exactly as China wants.

It remains to be seen whether Hong Kong will regain its former glory as the Pearl of the Orient or continue to be a pawn in the chess game of China and other world powers. But one thing is clear, Hong Kong’s new leader is largely responsible for stifling dissent in an iconic city once known for its vibrant civil society and freewheeling press.

Osmond Agbo, a public affairs analyst is the coordinator of the African Center for Transparency and organizer of the Save Nigeria project. E-mail: Eagleosmund@yahoo.com

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Man versus machine: the 1997 chess game that put AI in sight https://ajedrezenmexico.org/man-versus-machine-the-1997-chess-game-that-put-ai-in-sight/ Wed, 11 May 2022 10:28:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/man-versus-machine-the-1997-chess-game-that-put-ai-in-sight/ May 11, 1997 marked a turning point in the relationship between man and machine, when the artificial intelligence (AI) supercomputer Deep Blue finally achieved what developers had been promising for decades. Then world chess champion Garry Kasparov took one last dark look at the chessboard before storming out of the room: the chess king had […]]]>

May 11, 1997 marked a turning point in the relationship between man and machine, when the artificial intelligence (AI) supercomputer Deep Blue finally achieved what developers had been promising for decades.

Then world chess champion Garry Kasparov took one last dark look at the chessboard before storming out of the room: the chess king had just been beaten by a computer.

It was an “incredible” moment, AI expert Philippe Rolet told Agence France-Presse (AFP), although the lasting technological impact was not so huge.

“Deep Blue’s victory made people realize that machines could be as strong as humans, even on their turf,” he said.

Developers at IBM, the US company that created Deep Blue, were thrilled with the win but quickly refocused on a bigger meaning.

“It’s not about man versus machine. It’s really about how we humans use technology to solve tough problems,” said Deep Blue’s team leader , Chung-Jen Tan, after the game, listing the possible benefits of financial analysis to weather forecasting.

Even Chung would have struggled to understand how central AI has become – finding applications in almost every area of ​​human existence.

“AI has exploded in the last 10 years,” UCLA computer science professor Richard Korf told AFP.

“We are now doing things that were previously impossible.”

“A Man Cracked”

After his defeat, Kasparov, who is still widely regarded as the greatest chess player of all time, was furious.

He implied that there had been unfair practices, denied having really lost, and concluded that nothing at all had been proven about the power of computers.

He explained that the match could be seen as “one man, the best player in the world, (who) cracked under the pressure”.

The computer was beatable, he argued, because it had too many weak points.

Nowadays, the best computers will always beat even the strongest human chess players.

AI-powered machines have mastered every game and now have much bigger worlds to conquer.

Korf cites notable advances in facial recognition that have helped make self-driving cars a reality.

Yann LeCun, head of AI research at Meta/Facebook, told AFP there had been “absolutely incredible progress” in recent years.

LeCun, one of the founding fathers of modern AI, lists among the achievements of today’s computers an ability “to translate any language into any language in a set of 200 languages” or ” to have a single neural network that understands 100 languages”.

We are a long way from 1997, when Facebook didn’t even exist.

Machines “are not the danger”

Experts agree that Kasparov’s match was important as a symbol but left little technical legacy.

“There was nothing revolutionary about the design of Deep Blue,” Korf said, describing it as an evolution of methods that had been around since the 1950s.

“It was also a dedicated piece of hardware designed just for playing chess.”

Facebook, Google, and other tech companies have pushed AI in all sorts of other directions.

They fed increasingly powerful artificial intelligence machines with unimaginable amounts of data from their users, serving targeted content and advertising without remorse and forging trillion-dollar businesses in the process.

AI technology is now helping to decide everything from the temperature of a room to the price of car insurance.

Devices, from vacuum cleaners to doorbells, are equipped with sensor networks to provide AI systems with data to better target consumers.

While critics lament a loss of privacy, enthusiasts believe that AI products make everyone’s life easier.

Despite his painful history with machines, Kasparov is largely unfazed by the increasingly dominant position of AI.

“There is simply no evidence that the machines are threatening us,” he told AFP last year.

“The real danger does not come from killer robots but from people – because people always have a monopoly on evil.”

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“Did I just lose? xQc wins a game of chess and is immediately demolished by his next opponent https://ajedrezenmexico.org/did-i-just-lose-xqc-wins-a-game-of-chess-and-is-immediately-demolished-by-his-next-opponent/ Wed, 11 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/did-i-just-lose-xqc-wins-a-game-of-chess-and-is-immediately-demolished-by-his-next-opponent/ Felix “xQc” was playing chess online in a recent livestream and ended up winning a match by checkmate. However, the second game didn’t quite go to plan. While talking about the quality of his previous match, the streamer was quickly set up by his opponent. Perhaps distracted by his conversation or his own hubris, the […]]]>

Felix “xQc” was playing chess online in a recent livestream and ended up winning a match by checkmate. However, the second game didn’t quite go to plan.

While talking about the quality of his previous match, the streamer was quickly set up by his opponent. Perhaps distracted by his conversation or his own hubris, the streamer was quickly checked and mate after just four moves.


xQc gets overconfident and blows himself up in a game of chess

(The clip starts at 3:40:46)

A recent xQc stream had some rousing chess matches, where the streamer won by checkmate in a long battle. Cheering on his success, he immediately moved on to another game, his conversation coming to a halt with the fashionable game.

“Yes! Yes! I am a mathematician! It was analytical!

As the streamer sang of his victory, the next match had already started and the cat said he had already slipped up. Insisting that he hadn’t cheated, the current game was over before it even started. The player with the white pieces had already moved his queen into position, and xQc missed every chance he had to get out of the position he was in.

Moving a tower, he continued to talk about the previous game. The game continued as Felix spoke, and he continued to let himself be put in a dire situation.

“Guys, it was math! Wait, is that checkmate? did I just lose? Wait, wait.

xQc finally realized that the enemy queen was in line with their king, and all the other player had to do was take a pawn. At this point, if the streamer was to take the enemy queen, her bishop was there, to create another predicament – checkmate.

The defeat screen appeared and xQc just stared helplessly at the screen while his chat spammed OmegaLul’s emotes.


Reddit sheds light on streamer’s loss to Twitch

Naturally, the LiveStreamFails subreddit had a lot of fun at xQc’s expense, mocking the streamer with memes. What was happening in the match was clear to everyone except the streamer, who was too focused on the previous match.

A few people talked about the game itself, saying that the streamer had time to fix the issue it was in, but didn’t see it. Félix had several opportunities to at least checkmate then checkmate, but instead of making the right moves, he blundered and lost.

A Redditor mocked the streamer for having a rating of 1,000 on Chess.com, but was still hit with Scholar Mate, which is a way for a player to defeat an opponent in four moves in chess.

It looks like Felix could use a coach, and Reddit suggests Hikaru might be able to coach him and improve his chess skills. After all, Hikaru is a chess grandmaster. There’s a lot of knowledge he could pass on to someone like the Juicer.

It was a hilarious moment in the stream, where he went from being a conquering chess hero. Although Felix was hit with a very quick checkmate, it was incredibly entertaining for his audience and his fans.


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The 1997 chess game that put AI in the spotlight https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-1997-chess-game-that-put-ai-in-the-spotlight%ef%bf%bc/ Wed, 11 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-1997-chess-game-that-put-ai-in-the-spotlight%ef%bf%bc/ With her hand pressed firmly into her cheek and her eyes fixed on the table, Garry Kasparov threw a last dark look at the chessboard before storming out of the room: the king of chess had just been beaten by a computer. May 11, 1997 marked a turning point in the relationship between man and […]]]>

With her hand pressed firmly into her cheek and her eyes fixed on the table, Garry Kasparov threw a last dark look at the chessboard before storming out of the room: the king of chess had just been beaten by a computer.

May 11, 1997 marked a turning point in the relationship between man and machine, when the artificial intelligence (AI) supercomputer Deep Blue finally achieved what developers had been promising for decades.

AN “INCREDIBLE” MOMENT FOR AI

It was an “incredible” moment, artificial intelligence expert Philippe Rolet told AFP, although the lasting technological impact was not so huge.

“Deep Blue’s victory made people realize that machines could be as strong as humans, even on their turf,” he said.

Philippe Roulette

Developers at IBM, the US company that created Deep Blue, were thrilled with the win but quickly refocused on a bigger meaning.

“It’s not about man versus machine. It’s really about how we humans use technology to solve tough problems,” said team leader Deep Blue, Chung-Jen Tan, after the game, listing the possible benefits of financial analysis to weather forecasting.

Chung Jen Tan

Even Chung would have struggled to understand how central AI has become – finding applications in almost every area of ​​human existence.

“AI has exploded in the last 10 years,” UCLA computer science professor Richard Korf told AFP.

“We are now doing things that were previously impossible.”

Richard Korf

World chess champion Garry Kasparov makes a move in May 1997 in New York during his fourth game against the IBM Deep Blue chess computer. The monitor on the right transmits the movement of the computers to an IBM scientist who moves the pieces on the board. The score for the match is tied at 1.5 to 1.5, with each team with a win (one point) and a draw (which counts as half a point) in the six-game match. Since the victory of the Deep Blue computer against the chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997, the machine has continued to demonstrate its ability to surpass human beings in increasingly complex tasks… without always being unrivaled in terms of adaptability and versatility. Image: Stan Honda/AFP

THE AI HAS BEATEN THE GREATEST CHESS PLAYER OF ALL TIME

After his defeat, Kasparov, who is still widely regarded as the greatest chess player of all time, was furious.

He implied that there had been unfair practices, denied having really lost, and concluded that nothing at all had been proven about the power of computers.

He explained that the match could be seen as “one man, the best player in the world, (who) cracked under the pressure”.

The computer was beatable, he argued, because it had too many weak points.

“AI-POWERED MACHINES HAVE MASTERED EVERY GAME IN RUNNING”

Nowadays, the best computers will always beat even the strongest human chess players.

AI-powered machines have mastered every game and now have much bigger worlds to conquer.

Korf cites notable advances in facial recognition that have helped make self-driving cars a reality.

Yann LeCun, head of AI research at Meta/Facebook, told AFP there had been “absolutely incredible progress” in recent years.

LeCun, one of the founding fathers of modern AI, lists among the achievements of today’s computers an ability “to translate any language into any language in a set of 200 languages” or ” to have a single neural network that understands 100 languages”.

Yann LeCun

We are a long way from 1997 when Facebook didn’t even exist.

NOTHING REVOLUTIONARY IN AI CHESS MACHINE

Experts agree that Kasparov’s match was important as a symbol but left little technical legacy.

“There was nothing revolutionary about the design of Deep Blue,” Korf said, describing it as an evolution of methods that had been around since the 1950s.

“It was also dedicated hardware designed just for playing chess.”

Richard Korf

AI HAS BEEN PUSHED IN ALL SORTS OF OTHER DIRECTIONS

Facebook, Google, and other tech companies have pushed AI in all sorts of other directions.

They fed increasingly powerful artificial intelligence machines with unimaginable amounts of data from their users, serving targeted content and advertising without remorse and forging trillion-dollar businesses in the process.

AI technology is now helping to decide everything from the temperature of a room to the price of car insurance.

Devices, from vacuum cleaners to doorbells, are equipped with sensor networks to provide AI systems with data to better target consumers.

While critics lament a loss of privacy, enthusiasts believe that AI products make everyone’s life easier.

Despite his painful history with machines, Kasparov is largely unfazed by the increasingly dominant position of AI.

“There is simply no evidence that the machines are threatening us,” he told AFP last year.

“The real danger does not come from killer robots but from people – because people always have a monopoly on evil.”

Garry Kasparov

© Agence France-Presse/Cédric Simon, Laurent Barthélemy and Joseph Boyle


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The 1997 chess game that thrust AI into the limelight https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-1997-chess-game-that-thrust-ai-into-the-limelight/ Wed, 11 May 2022 03:22:15 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-1997-chess-game-that-thrust-ai-into-the-limelight/ Published on: 05/11/2022 – 05:22Amended: 05/11/2022 – 05:20 Paris (AFP)- With his hand firmly pressed against his cheek and his eyes fixed on the table, Garry Kasparov took one last dark look at the chessboard before storming out of the room: the king of chess had just been beaten by a computer. May 11, 1997 […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Paris (AFP)- With his hand firmly pressed against his cheek and his eyes fixed on the table, Garry Kasparov took one last dark look at the chessboard before storming out of the room: the king of chess had just been beaten by a computer.

May 11, 1997 marked a turning point in the relationship between man and machine, when the artificial intelligence (AI) supercomputer Deep Blue finally achieved what developers had been promising for decades.

It was an “incredible” moment, artificial intelligence expert Philippe Rolet told AFP, although the lasting technological impact was not so huge.

“Deep Blue’s victory made people realize that machines could be as strong as humans, even on their turf,” he said.

Developers at IBM, the US company that created Deep Blue, were thrilled with the win but quickly refocused on a bigger meaning.

“It’s not about man versus machine. It’s really about how we humans use technology to solve tough problems,” said Deep Blue’s team leader , Chung-Jen Tan, after the game, listing the possible benefits of financial analysis to weather forecasting.

Even Chung would have struggled to understand how central AI has become – finding applications in almost every area of ​​human existence.

“AI has exploded in the last 10 years,” UCLA computer science professor Richard Korf told AFP.

“We are now doing things that were previously impossible.”

“A Man Cracked”

After his defeat, Kasparov, who is still widely regarded as the greatest chess player of all time, was furious.

He implied that there had been unfair practices, denied having really lost, and concluded that nothing at all had been proven about the power of computers.

He explained that the match could be seen as “one man, the best player in the world, (who) cracked under the pressure”.

AI has come a long way since Deep Blue won chess in 1997, with the technology used in everything from financial analysis to weather forecasting Patrick T. FALLON AFP/File

The computer was beatable, he argued, because it had too many weak points.

Nowadays, the best computers will always beat even the strongest human chess players.

AI-powered machines have mastered every game and now have much bigger worlds to conquer.

Korf cites notable advances in facial recognition that have helped make self-driving cars a reality.

Yann LeCun, head of AI research at Meta/Facebook, told AFP there had been “absolutely incredible progress” in recent years.

LeCun, one of the founding fathers of modern AI, lists among the achievements of today’s computers an ability “to translate any language into any language in a set of 200 languages” or ” to have a single neural network that understands 100 languages”.

We are a long way from 1997, when Facebook didn’t even exist.

Machines “are not the danger”

Experts agree that Kasparov’s match was important as a symbol but left little technical legacy.

“There was nothing revolutionary about the design of Deep Blue,” Korf said, describing it as an evolution of methods that had been around since the 1950s.

“It was also a dedicated piece of hardware designed just for playing chess.”

Facebook, Google, and other tech companies have pushed AI in all sorts of other directions.

They fed increasingly powerful artificial intelligence machines with unimaginable amounts of data from their users, serving targeted content and advertising without remorse and forging trillion-dollar businesses in the process.

Since Deep Blue's chess victory over Garry Kasparov in 1997, AI has consistently demonstrated its ability to outperform humans in increasingly complex tasks.
Since Deep Blue’s chess victory over Garry Kasparov in 1997, AI has consistently demonstrated its ability to outperform humans in increasingly complex tasks. STAN HONDA AFP/File

AI technology is now helping to decide everything from the temperature of a room to the price of car insurance.

Devices, from vacuum cleaners to doorbells, are equipped with sensor networks to provide AI systems with data to better target consumers.

While critics lament a loss of privacy, enthusiasts believe that AI products make everyone’s life easier.

Despite his painful history with machines, Kasparov is largely unfazed by the increasingly dominant position of AI.

“There is simply no evidence that the machines threaten us,” he told AFP last year.

“The real danger does not come from killer robots but from people — because people always have a monopoly on evil.”

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Montpellier Pollard expects a ‘chess game’ in the Champions Cup against La Rochelle https://ajedrezenmexico.org/montpellier-pollard-expects-a-chess-game-in-the-champions-cup-against-la-rochelle/ Fri, 06 May 2022 02:16:03 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/montpellier-pollard-expects-a-chess-game-in-the-champions-cup-against-la-rochelle/ Paris (AFP) – Montpellier’s South African fly-half Handre Pollard has said he expects Saturday’s European Champions Cup quarter-final in La Rochelle to look like “a game of chess “. Montpellier qualify for the quarter-finals for only the second time in their history. They are heading to last season’s losing runners-up who have the likes of […]]]>


Paris (AFP) – Montpellier’s South African fly-half Handre Pollard has said he expects Saturday’s European Champions Cup quarter-final in La Rochelle to look like “a game of chess “.

Montpellier qualify for the quarter-finals for only the second time in their history.

They are heading to last season’s losing runners-up who have the likes of powerful Fijian center Levani Botia and Australian giant Will Skelton in their squad.

“It’s like any play-off, it’s about which team plays the smartest, plays the game of chess the right way,” Pollard, 28, told AFP on Wednesday. .

“We have to stand up physically, if we don’t we don’t stand a chance.

“We have some plans to deal with it and it could be interesting.”

Top 14 leaders Montpellier will be without 125kg second row Paul Willemse after the French striker was sidelined for two months with a knee injury suffered last weekend.

“It’s a big blow. Paulie, we all know he’s a brilliant player, he’s got a huge physical presence,” Pollard said.

“As a leader, he has grown a lot since he started playing international rugby. He will be missed.

– Liebenberg reunion –

Pollard will leave the Mediterranean coast at the end of the season to join English side Leicester Tigers and reunite with former South African sports performance manager Aled Walter.

“It’s a big change in terms of the weather,” Pollard joked.

“Aled Walters is the fitness coach and was with the Springboks at the World Cup.

“I love what he does, how he structures his week and getting his players in the best shape possible. That was a big part of that.

After appearing in all of his country’s Tests in November, his next appearance for the 2019 Rugby World Cup winners is set to come in July’s three-legged series at home to Wales.

“It will be good to be involved in bigger games in the last two months of the season, it’s always great preparation for Test matches,” Pollard said.

“The coaching staff in South Africa demand incredible standards, and as it should be, if you want to stay number one in the world because that’s what we’re trying to do, that’s what we’re working on. “

This weekend, Pollard will meet his captain from when South Africa won the World Junior Championship in 2012, La Rochelle flanker Wiaan Liebenberg.

Liebenberg spent two and a half seasons with Montpellier and will retire at the end of the season to study a Masters in Wealth Management.

“He also has such a great history with Montpellier,” Pollard said.

“It’s always difficult for him to return to play against Montpellier and it’s also his last season before retirement, so he’ll be there to stay in the competition as long as possible and enjoy every moment of it.”

Calendar (GMT times)

Saturday

Munster (IRL) v Toulouse (FRA) (1400), La Rochelle (FRA) v Montpellier (FRA), Leicester Tigers (ANG) v Leinster (IRL) (1630 each)

Sunday

Racing 92 (FRA) v Sale Sharks (ENG) (1400)

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