Chess tournaments – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 16:07:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-69.png Chess tournaments – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ 32 32 LCPS students compete in local chess tournaments https://ajedrezenmexico.org/lcps-students-compete-in-local-chess-tournaments/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 23:42:34 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/lcps-students-compete-in-local-chess-tournaments/ LAS CRUCES – The Las Cruces public school chess tournament attracted around 75 players across the district, but that was just the start of chess in Las Cruces. Students worked with volunteer coaches to hone their skills as chess began to gain popularity in the district. Camino Real Middle hosted the tournament on November 19, […]]]>

LAS CRUCES – The Las Cruces public school chess tournament attracted around 75 players across the district, but that was just the start of chess in Las Cruces.

Students worked with volunteer coaches to hone their skills as chess began to gain popularity in the district.

Camino Real Middle hosted the tournament on November 19, welcoming students from several LCPS schools including Mesa Middle, Monte Vista Elementary, Sonoma Elementary, Highland Elementary, Loma Heights Elementary, Mesilla Valley Leadership Academy, Zia Middle, Vista Middle, Arrowhead Park Early College High, Organ Mountain High, and Las Cruces High.

LCPS:Las Cruces teachers paid below average compared to the rest of the state. Here’s a look at the numbers.

The chess tournament was divided into three divisions, Elementary K-5, Middle School 6-8 and High School 9-12. In each division there were awards from 1st to 3rd for individual players and from 1st to 3rd for each team. The results of the Chess Tournament at Camino Real Middle School are as follows:

Manny Castillo, an elementary school chess champion plays chess with Sun-News writer Algernon D'Ammassa in the Sun-News newsroom on Wednesday, June 9, 2021.

Individual Elementary

  • 1st Manuel Castillo
  • 2nd (tied, 2nd overall) Ilijah Horcasitas
  • 2nd (tied, 3rd overall) Ezekiel Laos
  • 2nd (tied, 4th overall) Larry Crotts III
  • 2nd (tied, 5th overall) Benjamin Geiger

Elementary Team

  • 1st Monte Vista (directed by Manny Castillo)
  • 2nd Highland Primary
  • 3rd Mac Arthur Primary

College team

  • 1st Camino Real Varsity
  • 2nd Vista College
  • 3rd Camino Real Junior Varsity

High School Team

  • Arrowhead Park 1st High School
  • 2nd High Varsity Mountain Organ
  • 3rd Mountain High Junior Varsity organ
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AICF lines up 13 international chess tournaments for 2022 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/aicf-lines-up-13-international-chess-tournaments-for-2022/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 11:13:09 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/aicf-lines-up-13-international-chess-tournaments-for-2022/ The year of chess will kick off with the MPL National Junior Championship (Under 20) at IGI Stadium in New Delhi. Ahmedabad will have the honor of hosting the first international tournament, the Ahmedabad International Open, from February 23 to March 2. “For the first time, we have a sponsor for all national events in […]]]>

The year of chess will kick off with the MPL National Junior Championship (Under 20) at IGI Stadium in New Delhi.

Ahmedabad will have the honor of hosting the first international tournament, the Ahmedabad International Open, from February 23 to March 2.

“For the first time, we have a sponsor for all national events in the form of MPL,” said AICF President Dr Sanjay Kapoor. “Thanks to them and our other efforts, we will offer attractive prizes at every tournament,” he added.

The big events, the MPL Women’s National Championship (February 9-19) and the MPL Senior National Championship (February 9-21), will be held simultaneously in Bheemavaram in Andhra Pradesh and Kanpur, respectively.

Indian teams for all major world championships in the year 2022 will be selected from these events.

“These are exciting times for Indian chess,” said AICF secretary Bharat Singh Chauhan. “Our players, coming directly from the Under-8 category, will have plenty of opportunities to show their talent and get noticed.”

The other international tournaments will take place as follows:

Pune (March 4-11)

Guwahati (March 13-20)

Delhi (March 22-29)

Calcutta (May 21-29)

Odisha (May 31-June 8)

Visakhapatnam (June 10-18)

Bangalore (June 20-28)

Punjab (22-30 August)

Bikaner (September 1-9)

Indore (September 11-19)

Chattisgarh (September 21-29)

Uttar Pradesh (October 1-9)

Source: Press release

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The AICF organizes 13 international chess tournaments for 2022 and increases the prices of nationals https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-aicf-organizes-13-international-chess-tournaments-for-2022-and-increases-the-prices-of-nationals/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 10:11:05 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-aicf-organizes-13-international-chess-tournaments-for-2022-and-increases-the-prices-of-nationals/ New Delhi, December 6 (IANS) After signing a new annual sponsor, the All-India Chess Federation (AICF) has hosted no less than 13 open international tournaments across the country as part of a busy schedule for 2022. And to make things attractive to players, the AICF has increased the prize money for all national championships, having […]]]>

New Delhi, December 6 (IANS) After signing a new annual sponsor, the All-India Chess Federation (AICF) has hosted no less than 13 open international tournaments across the country as part of a busy schedule for 2022. And to make things attractive to players, the AICF has increased the prize money for all national championships, having succeeded in arranging sponsorship for all major events.

“For the first time, we have a sponsor for all national events in the form of MPL,” said AICF President Sanjay Kapoor. “Thanks to them and our other efforts, we will offer attractive prizes at every tournament,” he added.

The AICF signed a sponsorship agreement worth Rs 1 crore per year with MPL Sports and therefore decided to spend Rs 76 lakh as prize money for the various national championships. The prize fund for senior nationals, open and women, will see an increase of Rs 10 lakh while the prize money for national juniors will be increased by Rs 7.50 lakh.

The year of chess will kick off with the MPL National Junior Championship (Under 20) at the IGI Stadium in New Delhi while Ahmedabad will have the honor of hosting the first international tournament, the Ahmedabad International Open, from 23 February to March 2, the AICF informed Monday in a statement.

The big events, the MPL Women’s National Championship (February 9-19) and the MPL Senior National Championship (February 9-21), will be held simultaneously in Bheemavaram in Andhra Pradesh and Kanpur, respectively. The senior national MPL championship in Bheemavaram will have a total fund of Rs 30 lakh while that of the women’s event in Kanpur will be Rs 25 lakh.

Indian teams for all major world championships in the year 2022 will be selected from these events.

“These are exciting times for Indian chess,” said AICF secretary Bharat Singh Chauhan. “Our players, coming directly from the Under-8 category, will have plenty of opportunities to show their talent and get noticed.”

The other international tournaments will be held in Pune (March 4-11), Guwahati (March 13-20), Delhi (March 22-29), Kolkata (May 21-29), Bhubaneswar (May 31-June 8), Visakhapatnam ( 10-18 June), Bengaluru (20-28 June), Punjab (22-30 August), Bikaner (1-9 September), Indore (11-19 September), Chhattisgarh (21-29 September) and Uttar Pradesh (1 October 9).

–IANS

bsk / cs

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Lam, Narine, Nathoo winners of chess tournaments sponsored by MMG + https://ajedrezenmexico.org/lam-narine-nathoo-winners-of-chess-tournaments-sponsored-by-mmg/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/lam-narine-nathoo-winners-of-chess-tournaments-sponsored-by-mmg/ Pooja Lam, Ricardo Narine and Loris Nathoo emerged victorious in the women’s, junior and senior divisions when the Guyana Chess Federation-sponsored MMG +-sponsored online quick tournaments wrapped up last weekend. “All three tournaments, sponsored by Mobile Money Guyana Inc., started on Saturday [November 26th] with the ladies and girls then concluded on Sunday [November 27th] […]]]>

Pooja Lam, Ricardo Narine and Loris Nathoo emerged victorious in the women’s, junior and senior divisions when the Guyana Chess Federation-sponsored MMG +-sponsored online quick tournaments wrapped up last weekend.

“All three tournaments, sponsored by Mobile Money Guyana Inc., started on Saturday [November 26th] with the ladies and girls then concluded on Sunday [November 27th] with the juniors (under 20) and the seniors ”, specifies a press release from the federation.

The statement added: “The players participated in seven (7) rounds of competition, each match with a 15 minute time control with two second increments (15 minutes + 2 seconds), with the exception of seniors who have played matches lasting 10 minutes in two second increments (10 min + 2 sec). The tournaments were hosted on the Tornelo.com platform and were managed and supervised by FIDE referee John Lee.

Ricardo Narine

In the women’s quick section, Lam went undefeated to secure the title. Sherlyta Campayne finished second with 5.5 points while Jessica Callender completed the top three with 5 points. The division also included upcoming talents such as eight-year-old Faraa Gaskin, Kristin Xavier and Kataleya Sam.

Likewise, in the Junior Rapid division, Narine finished at the top of the standings with six points. Keron Sandiford also finished with six points but lost first place after losing to Narine in their clash. Kyle Couchman secured third place with 5.5 points.

Julian Mohabir (4 points), Adhiraj Kissoon (3 points), Javier Davenand (3 points) and Arush Ramnarine (2.5 points) also participated in the event.

Pooja lam

Meanwhile, Nathoo defeated all of his opponents to win the senior division. Former national champion and Fide master Anthony Drayton finished second with five points while Roberto Nero came third.

The respective winners pocketed $ 10,000, while the corresponding finalists received $ 8,000. The respective third places received $ 7,000.

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Women’s chess tournaments undermine women in chess https://ajedrezenmexico.org/womens-chess-tournaments-undermine-women-in-chess/ Sun, 25 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/womens-chess-tournaments-undermine-women-in-chess/ In a society where gender equality is increasing, why do women’s chess tournaments still exist? Most physical sports separate men and women because men have more upper body and leg strength than women. Men and women have virtually no intellectual difference, yet many chess tournaments have mixed competitions and competitions for women only. Proponents of […]]]>

In a society where gender equality is increasing, why do women’s chess tournaments still exist?

Most physical sports separate men and women because men have more upper body and leg strength than women. Men and women have virtually no intellectual difference, yet many chess tournaments have mixed competitions and competitions for women only.

Proponents of this practice argue that the supply of female chess tournaments increases and encourages the participation of women in chess, however, in reality, female chess tournaments fuel the misogynistic perception that women are intellectually weak and less able. than men of the enormous logic and reasoning that chess requires.

To understand why we shouldn’t have women’s chess tournaments, we must first take a closer look at why they exist. The official tournaments have two sections: mixed and female. As data collected by the International Chess Federation shows, only 15% of registered chess players are women. So, female chess supporters point out that we need female chess to encourage female participation in this male dominated sport.

The opposite is true. Girls often give up on failures because of anti-female stereotypes. This atmosphere is only accentuated by the women’s chess tournaments, which communicate to children that boys must be better.

Some supporters of women’s chess tournaments believe that women are just worse at chess. This view is supported by a series of highly questionable essays by Richard Lynn for Nature magazine, in which he proclaimed that “after adolescence, men are smarter than women”. Its main line of evidence came from a review of IQ tests in which men consistently scored 2-5 points higher than women.

Lynn’s conclusions have been widely disputed. There are many variables that can explain the difference in IQ scores. Perhaps the group of people Lynn studied did not reflect the general population. Due to the fluctuating nature of IQ tests and other variables, Lynn’s findings have been largely ignored by the scientific community.

While the participation of women in chess tournaments is shockingly low, at around 15% of players, the number of female grandmasters is even smaller, at 1%. Part of the problem is that less competitive women’s tournaments don’t require players to hone their skills.

Grandmaster Sam Shankland told NPR, “In order for women to really make marks in the chess world, we really need to get some women to reach the top. In order for this to happen, they have to jump through all the same hurdles as men, because if they only get free cookies every now and then, they won’t have as much of an incentive to improve themselves.

The two highest ranked chess players of all time do not play in women’s chess matches. Judit Polgar, the strongest chess player of all time, who reached eighth place on the mixed chess scale, has not played in any women’s tournament. She said women can be as good as male chess players, but only if they meet this standard.

Hou Yifan, the current world No. 1 chess player, no longer plays in women’s chess tournaments. These players succeeded because they refused to fall into the trap of women’s chess tournaments and became famous thanks to the more competitive mixed tournaments.

Women’s chess tournaments don’t provide women with the tough competition they need to improve, but rather treat women as intellectually inferior to men. Women’s tournaments undermine female participation in sport by subtly suggesting that women are not able to compete at the same level as men.

Aditya Oswal is an eighth grade student at Trent Middle School in Frisco and an avid chess player.

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High school student organizes fundraising chess tournaments for Artsakh aid: next November 14 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/high-school-student-organizes-fundraising-chess-tournaments-for-artsakh-aid-next-november-14/ Sun, 08 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/high-school-student-organizes-fundraising-chess-tournaments-for-artsakh-aid-next-november-14/ He explained how it works: “It’s simple. When people donate through Donate Box online, we send them a code for the tournament, which takes place on lichess.org. They then enter the tournament code when the time comes and the tournament begins. Lichess itself is a completely free website and the tournament will be 100 minutes […]]]>

He explained how it works: “It’s simple. When people donate through Donate Box online, we send them a code for the tournament, which takes place on lichess.org. They then enter the tournament code when the time comes and the tournament begins. Lichess itself is a completely free website and the tournament will be 100 minutes long. Each player will have 10 minutes on their clock per game.

There is no limit on the number of participants, Arshak continued, and lichess.org is convenient and well organized. He said, “It’s organized like an arena. We don’t necessarily play against people who have the same score. After a match, won or lost, you play against another player.

In other words, kids might end up playing against other kids or against strong adult players. Archak said: “This is a great way, as a child, to experience one very strong opponent and one who has the same experience as the child. Identities are not shown, although some Armenians may recognize opponents’ usernames.

The top five players from each tournament will receive certificates and souvenir prizes. Additionally, Arshak was able to organize an additional special prize for the tournament winners. The winner of the October 31 tournament will be able to play some quick chess games against Grandmaster Hrant Melkumyan, while the winner of the November 14 tournament will play against International Master and Woman Grandmaster Lilit Mkrtchian.
Archak said he messaged them with no expectations but everyone really supported him and shared the tournament news.

Lilit mkrtchian

On top of that, Arshak worked hard to promote the tournament. He said he contacted the chess federation in Armenia, and another chess community or forum of Armenian chess players. He took to Facebook and other social media to spread the news. He said he made everyone he knew advertise on social media, including his parents. He also contacted school chess communities and Armenian groups.

Archak avetisyan

Archak said: “Special thanks to everyone who supported me! I got into this without any expectations and got a lot of support from a lot of people, and I’m very grateful for it. In particular, he mentioned Fr. Hovsep Karapetyan of the Armenian Apostolic Church of St. Mary, who gave him a platform and helped him make the donor bucket, as well as other organizational things. Zareh Asatryan, an economist based in Mannheim, Germany, helped publicize the tournament and generally supported Arshak, as was active Armenian community leader Mihran Aroian of Austin, Texas.

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Celebrity Chess Tournaments | ChessBase https://ajedrezenmexico.org/celebrity-chess-tournaments-chessbase/ Sat, 17 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/celebrity-chess-tournaments-chessbase/ The stars also play chess In 1988, Erik Estrada [pictured] was a celebrity, having portrayed Highway Patrol Officer Frank Poncherello in the hit television series Fries from 1977 to 1983. Estrada and seven other celebrities performed in a three-game, 30-game one-day chess tournament alongside the three-day Memorial Day Classic. The latter attracted 413 chess players, […]]]>

The stars also play chess

In 1988, Erik Estrada [pictured] was a celebrity, having portrayed Highway Patrol Officer Frank Poncherello in the hit television series Fries from 1977 to 1983. Estrada and seven other celebrities performed in a three-game, 30-game one-day chess tournament alongside the three-day Memorial Day Classic. The latter attracted 413 chess players, including a 155-player Open section led by four GMs and five IMs. Like John hillery flagged for Life in chess (September 1988 issue, download here), “Between towers? Something for everyone: a talk by Walter Browne, the still young George Koltanowski with his stories and Knight’s tour, a magician, a celebrity tournament, a blitz tournament and a demonstration of the new computer program “Chessbase”.

The 1988 Memorial Day Classic was won by General Managers Larry Christiansen and Walter Browne and IM Jack Peters. Regarding the sideline celebrity chess tournament, Peters said, “I think that sort of thing is good for chess; it’s good to let the players know that the stars are playing too.

Celebrity Chess, Polish Edition

As of 2019, ChessBase is no longer a new computer program but in its 15th edition. Although hosting a celebrity chess tournament is not a new idea either, having one with Polish stars is new. Michał Kanarkiewicz was born in 1995 and had never heard of the 1988 Celebrity Chess Tournament. Yet like the Los Angeles organizers of 1988, Kanarkiewicz wanted to show that chess has something to offer to everyone. everyone, including the stars. Plus, it’s exciting for chess players to realize that their favorite celebrities love chess just like them.

The “All-Star Chess Championship” received a lot of attention in the Polish press, including This article. The tournament took place on November 27, 2019 at a prestigious venue, the PGE Narodowy in Warsaw. Participants included a television meteorologist and a ballroom dance champion. the tournament was won by actor Slawomir Doliniec. International referee and MI Andrzej Filipowicz, better known as the head referee of the 2014 Anand-Carlsen World Chess Championship match, was the tournament director.

Poland, chess

The “Star Chess Championship” took place in Warsaw

Interview with Michał Kanarkiewicz

AR (Alexey Root): How did you come up with the idea for the “Chess Championship of Stars”?

MK (Michał Kanarkiewicz): There are a lot of celebrity events, for example in football, tennis and golf. But there isn’t that much celebrity chess activity. Therefore, I decided to create and organize the First All-Star Chess Championship. I started with no previous experience in such events, no budget and few contacts. But I knew that chess is an interesting, valuable and very ennobling game for the stars in question.

AR: How did you decide which celebrities to contact and how did you convince them to participate?

MK: By researching Google and social media, I found 100 celebrities who are connected with chess. For example, they played with friends, or they played chess as a child, or their children played chess. Then I contacted them. Of course, without a budget, I was sure it would be difficult to invite them. Particularly in 2019, before COVID-19, stars generally only attended events if they received compensation. In addition, some of them had conflicts over the date of the tournament. In the end, there were 12 stars ready to play.

AR: How does “Chess Championship of Stars” match your goals?

Michał KanarkiewiczMK: I invested my own money to create this event, because I really believe that this kind of project will help popularize chess in Poland. However, the Chess Championship of Stars also made me more popular. In recent months, I have been able to give chess lessons to Polish athletes such as Karol Bielecki and Krzysztof Ignaczak.

Nine months after the Chess Championship of Stars, I had the immense pleasure of being a co-organizer – with FIDE Vice-President Lukasz Turlej, Silesian Chess Federation President Andrzej Matusiak, Mokate Adam CEO Mokrysz and BNP Paribas Bank Polska CEO Przemek Gdanski – from the visit of former world chess champion Anatoly Karpov to Poland (Ustron and Warsaw). In the Karpov simultaneous exhibition in honor of Mokate’s 30th birthday, mentioned in the ChessBase article on chess and coffee, I drew Karpov after a hard fight. This game will stay with me forever.

Game


Master Class Vol.6: Anatoly Karpov

On this DVD, a team of experts take a close look at the secrets of Karpov’s games. In addition to 7 hours of video, the authors examine four essential aspects of Karpov’s superb play.


Connections

  • For more information on Michał Kanarkiewicz, visit his website.
  • For more information on the “All-Star Chess Championship”, click on these links
    • Pictures
    • Articles in Polish magazines:
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How to organize chess tournaments: Swiss-Manager https://ajedrezenmexico.org/how-to-organize-chess-tournaments-swiss-manager/ Fri, 18 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/how-to-organize-chess-tournaments-swiss-manager/ What happens when you bring together powerful pairing software and one of the world’s leading online chess platforms? In this article I (international referee Tania Karali) explain how you can use Swiss-Manager to create your own tournaments of all kinds and organize them on Chess.com. Presentation of Swiss Manager Tournament creation Organize Scheveningen tournaments Simultaneous […]]]>

What happens when you bring together powerful pairing software and one of the world’s leading online chess platforms? In this article I (international referee Tania Karali) explain how you can use Swiss-Manager to create your own tournaments of all kinds and organize them on Chess.com.

  1. Presentation of Swiss Manager
  2. Tournament creation
  3. Organize Scheveningen tournaments
  4. Simultaneous exhibitions

1. Presentation of Swiss-Manager

Today, Swiss-Manager is one of the most popular matchmaking programs in the chess world. Developed by Heinz Herzog, it is endorsed by FIDE, has been translated into 24 languages ​​to date, is currently used by over 180 federations around the world and has generated over 600,000 tournament files.

Swiss-Manager is very user-friendly and allows you to create both individual and team tournaments, in Swiss and round-robin formats or any other type of tournament you wish, or even simultaneous exhibitions. If you are not familiar with the program or if you have difficulty with some of its functions, you can consult my “User Guide”.

The guide goes step by step through how to install the software on your computer and set up a new tournament, but it also explores deeper waters, such as how to upload photos of the game location to chess. -results.com or calculate prize money according to the Hort system. In addition, it will soon be translated into eight languages: Greek, Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, German and Persian.

Download the program from swiss-manager.at.

2. Creation of tournaments

The basic steps for creating a tournament file, after downloading Swiss-Manager on your PC, are as follows:

  • Create a new file by selecting File → New Tournament … You can choose between Swiss System (Individual), Swiss System for Teams, Round-Robin (Individual) and Round-Robin for Teams) and enter tournament data. Basically every type of tournament format can be created by using any of these options and adjusting a few settings as explained below.
  • Enter the players by selecting Entry → Enter players … For team events, select Entry → Enter teams … then, select Entry → Enter players …. Choose each team at the top right of the screen and enter its members.
  • Set tie-breaks by selecting Input → Set up tournament …, tab – Tie-break variables, like “Buchholz”, can be selected more than once.
  • Make the pairings by selecting Pairings → Computer pairings … – In this window you can also experiment with accelerated systems.
  • Enter the results by choosing Input → Enter results … For team events, you must enter the total team result and the individual results.
The basic tournament dialog.

3. Organize Scheveningen tournaments

As online chess grew more and more, the tournaments in Scheveningen became very popular.

IA Tania Karali at the Senior World Team. Photo: Vladimir Jagr.

The Scheveningen system is a method of organizing a chess match between two teams. Each player on one team faces each player on the other team. The team with the most games won is the winner. This system is a popular way to create title standard opportunities. The system was first used at a tournament in Scheveningen, the Netherlands in 1923. The idea behind it was that a team of ten Dutch players could face ten foreign masters. This was intended to give the players on the team an experience in the face of stiff competition.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheveningen_system

To organize a Scheveningen tournament, start by creating a “Round Robin for Teams” file and enter the two teams that will compete against each other. Next, enter the players from each team and make the pairings, selecting “Scheveningen Tournament” as the pairing option. It is important to enter the players before making the pairings, so that Swiss-Manager can provide the table pairings for each round. The number of rounds that will be played will be defined by the number of tables, which you can enter by selecting Enter → Configure tournament …. In the same dialog window, you can define all tables of each team to play with the same color every turn or not. Keep in mind that the pairs that will be produced will be different from those shown in the corresponding tables, which means that opponents can play against each other in different rounds. What is important is that each player on one team will play against each player on the other team, just in a different order.

4. Simultaneous exhibitions

You can also use Swiss-Manager to create a file for simultaneous exhibition, where a high level player meets a number of other players. Start by creating a tournament file using the “Round Robin” option and enter the players starting with the simul-dealer. Then, make the pairings, by selecting the option “Simultaneous tournament” and Swiss-Manager will do the rest.

If you want to know more about using Swiss-Manager, be sure to download the complete guide, AND see Chess.com to guide to use our Swiss-Manager and Chess.com to quickly match opponents in online games.

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Pendyala Harikrishna: online chess tournaments are here to stay https://ajedrezenmexico.org/pendyala-harikrishna-online-chess-tournaments-are-here-to-stay/ Thu, 16 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/pendyala-harikrishna-online-chess-tournaments-are-here-to-stay/ June turned out to be a month of mixed fortunes for Pendyala Harikrishna. He took second place at the Sharjah World Stars online tournament, but finished last at the Chessable Masters, one of the strongest chess events in the digital space. India # 2 is disappointed with the results of the chess tournament, yes, but […]]]>

June turned out to be a month of mixed fortunes for Pendyala Harikrishna. He took second place at the Sharjah World Stars online tournament, but finished last at the Chessable Masters, one of the strongest chess events in the digital space.

India # 2 is disappointed with the results of the chess tournament, yes, but not with the quality of their chess. With any luck, he reckons, he would even have had a chance to secure a knockout berth in the tournament, part of the $ 1 million Magnus Carlsen Tour that ensured the lockdown induced by the coronavirus around the world has not had an impact on competitive chess at the highest level.

READ | Kerala’s first LARP Grandmaster Gopal targets 2650 Elo

Harikrishna was placed in the more difficult of the two pools at the Chessable Masters. Carlsen, the American Hikaru Nakamura and the Russian trio of Daniil Dubov, Alexander Grischuk and Vladislav Artemiev were his opponents in Group A.

His campaign got off to a bad start, losing in the first round to Artemiev, the 22-year-old who is a rising star in world chess. But he had one more chance than to make up for that poor start in the second round encounter, that too against Carlsen.

A tactical oversight turned out to be costly, however. “I kind of missed out on the winning streak, which was there for everyone to see,” he says. “I shouldn’t have lost this game.”

He thinks the event would have been very different for him if he had won this encounter. After all, nothing in world chess matters more than a victory over Carlsen.

“No doubt I would have played the rest of the tournament in a much better frame of mind if I had beaten the world champion,” said the Indian No.2. Sports star by phone from Prague, where he moved from Hyderabad after marrying Serbian chess player Nadezda Stojanovic.

Harikrishna suffered another loss in the third round – against Dubov – then drew with Nakamura in the fourth. He did manage to end the day with at least one victory, however. He beat Grischuk in the fifth round.

It was always going to be difficult to come back after such a terrible opening day, even with five games to go (the format was all-play-all, twice). In the return leg, he lost to Artemiev and drew with Carlsen, Dubov and Nakamura in successive matches before losing to Grischuk in the final round.

“The second day was much better for me than the first,” he says. “But I missed some crucial moves, otherwise I would still have had some outside chances to qualify for the quarter-finals.”

“I think what Magnus Carslen has done is remarkable. He didn’t have to do something like that. No one expected him to offer a top quality tournament series at a time when chess – and all other sports – were brought to a halt by the coronavirus, ”Harikrishna said. – PHOTO FILE / RAJEEV BHATT

The Sharjah tournament took place a week before Chessable Masters. He was the second seed behind Shakhryar Mamedyarov of Azerbaijan, who then justified the billing by winning the tournament by one point.

“Even though I couldn’t finish as a champion, I thought I had done well,” he said. “It was a pretty strong tournament too, with an average Elo rating of 2709.”

The Chessable Masters was, of course, much stronger. “I was happy when I got the invitation to play,” he says. “I had followed the Carlsen Tour closely. I started badly and it’s very important to have a good start when playing in such big tournaments. When you slide down the lower half of the court, you’re always under pressure. When you are in good shape your opponents will not stretch past a point, but when you are struggling they will push harder.

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However, he believes he performed better than his results suggest. “My failures were satisfactory,” he says. “And I had the bad luck to lose some games in which I was better placed.”

Regarding the tournament’s double-rounder format, he says everything was fine, but thinks it would have been better if the 12 players hadn’t been split into groups. “Instead of two groups, I thought it would have been interesting if all the players met once,” said the world No. 26. “However, the tour is a great idea and we have to pay tribute to Carlsen.”

The tour organized by the Norwegian genius will have an additional stop – Legends of Chess, which runs from July 21 to August 5 – before the grand finale, which takes place from August 9 to 20. The Magnus Carlsen Invitational and Lindores Abbey The Rapid Challenges were organized before the Chessable Masters.

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“I think what Carslen has done is remarkable,” says Harikrishna. “He didn’t have to do something like that. No one expected him to offer a top-quality tournament series at a time when chess – and all other sports – were brought to a halt by the coronavirus. “

The Carlsen Tour is, of course, just one of the many online chess tournaments hosted by organizers around the world. “There is no doubt that chess has become even more popular during the lockdown,” he says. “I think online chess tournaments will continue to be played even when normality returns to the world after the pandemic.”

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Tripura Man’s Online Chess Tournaments Become a Big Hit in Covid-19 Era https://ajedrezenmexico.org/tripura-mans-online-chess-tournaments-become-a-big-hit-in-covid-19-era/ Mon, 11 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/tripura-mans-online-chess-tournaments-become-a-big-hit-in-covid-19-era/ To ward off boredom in the Covid-19-induced era, Tripura-based engineer Nirmal Das held 71 international online chess competitions, which began three days after the scale lockdown began. of the country on March 25. The 39-year-old civil engineer said 975 players from 10 countries, including unrest-torn Syria, have taken part in his free online chess competition. […]]]>

To ward off boredom in the Covid-19-induced era, Tripura-based engineer Nirmal Das held 71 international online chess competitions, which began three days after the scale lockdown began. of the country on March 25.

The 39-year-old civil engineer said 975 players from 10 countries, including unrest-torn Syria, have taken part in his free online chess competition. “Every day the number of players is increasing. To keep the enthusiasm before the participation there are free practice sessions,” Das told IANS.

FIDE master Prasenjit Dutta, All India School chess champion Arshiya Das, international referee Pradip Kumar Roy and many top players have played matches on Das’ online platform. International master Neeraj Kumar would play on Monday night, he said.

“I plan to give cash prizes to the top 10 ranked players in the 75th (Platinum Jubilee) competition, which will be held on May 15. My goal is to attract players from 100 countries,” said Das, who works in the Department of Public Works of Tripura (PWD).

The first “Lockdown Online International Chess Tournament” competition, on March 28, brought together 15 local enthusiasts, including the seven-year-old son of Das, who had competed in the National Under-7 Championship in 2019 in Calcutta.

“Over the past 45 days, chess players and fans from many states, such as Delhi, Assam and Karnataka, and many countries including Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, the Philippines, South Korea , Germany, Brazil, United Arab Emirates and Syria, entered the competition, ”he said.

The online chess competition is held in four formats, starting at 8 p.m. daily. The bullet, blitz, and quick formats last two hours, and two and a half hours for classic chess. The workout takes place early in the morning and at noon.

Faced with the Covid-19 pandemic, Prime Minister Narendra Modi suggested changing lifestyles. “I think this online chess competition will act like a ‘Corona drug. Every day there is a slogan in the game to stay healthy and exercise, ”Das said.

He said chess has been his passion since his student life, but not digitally. “To help those staying at home not get bored during the lockdown, I logged into lichess.org, a chess portal. It prompted me to start the tournament,” Das said.

The uniqueness of this online chess site, he said, was that anyone could watch two players play from any part of the world.

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