chess players – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 21:42:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-69.png chess players – Ajedrez En Mexico http://ajedrezenmexico.org/ 32 32 Hayden High Good Kids Are Terrific Championship Chess Players https://ajedrezenmexico.org/hayden-high-good-kids-are-terrific-championship-chess-players/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 21:42:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/hayden-high-good-kids-are-terrific-championship-chess-players/ TOPEKA (WIBW) — Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford, two freshmen at Hayden High, love chess. About four years ago the school had a very strong chess team, then it fell apart because Hayden just didn’t have enough students interested in joining the chess club. These two young men are trying to interest more students. Matthew […]]]>

TOPEKA (WIBW) — Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford, two freshmen at Hayden High, love chess. About four years ago the school had a very strong chess team, then it fell apart because Hayden just didn’t have enough students interested in joining the chess club. These two young men are trying to interest more students. Matthew has competed at very high levels and will play nationally.

Ethan started playing chess in 5th grade at Christ The King Catholic School. He hadn’t really played chess much in the past two years due to tournaments being canceled due to Covid, and no one can really play him at home! Over the past few months, Ethan (the player wearing the glasses) has been playing a lot online and was able to participate in three tournaments recently. This qualified him to go to State in Emporia, where now his rating has really improved recently after getting a few tournaments under his belt. He’s really looking forward to improving his grade even further, and our Good Kids are hoping to put together a chess team at Hayden High.

Matthew’s fatjer taught him the game when he was just a kindergartener and in first grade! Matthew started playing tournaments around 2nd and 3rd grade. He said his most exciting moment was making his best shots in the national tournament in Nashville – and placed 51st in Grade 7. One of Matthew’s proudest moments was last week when he won the Chanute Tournament and had to beat one of the best players in the state. Another proud moment took place two years ago when he was in grade 7 and he moved up to high school and won the high school tournament! The Kansas State Championship took place in Emporia this month, where he was looking forward to playing against some of the grandmasters in the state.

Ethan also participated in the State Chess Tournament at Emporia State. He took 16th place out of 124 kids with 4 points. It was a tough competition, everyone he played against was ranked higher than him. There were 124 children in the K-12 section. Matthew placed 5th and Ethan placed 16th. They did fantastic. Matthew had 5 points and Ethan had 4 points. Congratulations to this week’s Good Kids and to the amazing young chess players, Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford!

Copyright 2022 WIBW. All rights reserved.

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Moms and Money: Springfield Chess Club https://ajedrezenmexico.org/moms-and-money-springfield-chess-club/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 13:42:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/moms-and-money-springfield-chess-club/ SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) — It’s a rare sight to see a room full of college kids that’s nearly silent. The kids inside the cafeteria at Fair Grove High School are too busy to talk, they’re playing chess. “This is the third round of the Spring School Chess Tournament,” said Roger Pagel, a Springfield Chess Club […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) — It’s a rare sight to see a room full of college kids that’s nearly silent. The kids inside the cafeteria at Fair Grove High School are too busy to talk, they’re playing chess.

“This is the third round of the Spring School Chess Tournament,” said Roger Pagel, a Springfield Chess Club volunteer.

Springfield Chess Club volunteer Roger Pagel kept busy during the tournament, helping young players,

“Basically all I’m trying to do is teach them the game and some of the etiquette of the game and some of the rules of the game and how to use the clock and make sure they do the right moves,” Pagel said. “I mean, there are all sorts of skill levels here.”

Pagel began playing in 1972 when his family moved to Missouri from Germany where his father was stationed. His appreciation of the game has only grown over the years.

“There’s just no way to master the game,” Pagel said. “It’s not like bowling, where you can throw a 300. We’re always going to make a mistake somewhere, no matter how good you are.”

Pagel said it’s a game of skill that requires the discipline of an athlete.

“Well, that’s a debate we’ve had for a long time,” Pagel said. “We chess players consider it a sport. It’s not a physical sport, but it’s physically demanding, when you get really good, because you have to sit for five hours and it’s hard to sit for five hours and maintain a very high level of concentration.

The Springfield Chess Club meets every Friday night from 7-11 p.m. at the South Side Senior Center on Freemont. Everyone is welcome, regardless of skill or age, and the event is free. To learn more about the Springfield Chess Club, click here.

To report a correction or typo, please email digitalnews@ky3.com

Copyright 2022 KY3. All rights reserved.

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Local Chess Club Relaunches Group, Plans Multi-State Tournament | Local News https://ajedrezenmexico.org/local-chess-club-relaunches-group-plans-multi-state-tournament-local-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/local-chess-club-relaunches-group-plans-multi-state-tournament-local-news/ SHERIDAN – A group of men sit around chessboards in the Golden Room at the Sheridan County YMCA. Regularly, the men move pawns in place and discuss everything under the sun. Over the course of a few conversations, this small group of chess enthusiasts decided to increase their impact on the community by restarting a […]]]>

SHERIDAN – A group of men sit around chessboards in the Golden Room at the Sheridan County YMCA. Regularly, the men move pawns in place and discuss everything under the sun.

Over the course of a few conversations, this small group of chess enthusiasts decided to increase their impact on the community by restarting a well-known chess group.

The youth and adult group met at the YMCA before COVID-19 hit, but disbanded due to pandemic concerns. Now the group is officially run by the Sheridan Chess Association, which is affiliated with the American Chess Federation.

“It’s a chance to get the kids involved,” said Larry Mooney.

A group of about 20 young people and adults sat around tables of four – two sets of chess each – while munching on dinner sponsored by Powder River Pizza in the Sheridan KidsLife building on Thursday night. Several students paired up with someone their own age, while younger customers paired up with long-time chess fanatics. The adults faced off and discussed strategy throughout the evening.

Before heading out for the night, Dan Casey led a group lesson on certain elements of the game, providing an educational component beyond just collecting soft skills.

The Sheridan Chess Association restarted as the Sheridan Chess Club in September 2021 and has yet to regain its pre-pandemic attendance count of approximately 150. As a non-profit organization, the club’s former founders hope to restore the love of the game and the participation of young people. to the adult.

To help build excitement, the nonprofit will host its first-ever multi-state tournament at Sheridan College on April 30 and May 1.

The Sheridan Wyoming Open Chess Tournament is a ranked event in American Chess and already includes 22 players with a capacity of up to 100 or 120 individual players.

The first place winner receives a $1,600 purse, followed by $800 for second place, $400 for third, $200 for fourth, and $100 for fifth in Division 1, which is the open division . Chess players with a rating below 1600 or not rated by US Chess will receive $400 for first place, $200 for second, $100 for third, $50 for fourth, and $25 for fifth.

Pre-registration costs $35, while day of registration costs $45. Pre-registration closes April 15.

Saturday rounds start at 9:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday rounds start at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m., or one after the other. Membership in the US Chess Foundation is required to participate in the event.

The highest-rated registrant is Alexander Fishbein, an American chess player with a FIDE Grandmaster title – International Chess Federation or World Chess Federation.

People from Missouri, Tennessee, Colorado, Idaho and South Dakota told organizers they plan to attend.

Participation is free and children will receive a pizza at each gathering. Registration is also available at the YMCA or KidsLife.

Ashleigh Snoozy joined The Sheridan Press in October 2016 as a reporter before taking on the role of editor in November 2018. She is originally from Colorado and graduated from Biola University in Los Angeles.

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Ukrainian army of chess players take up arms to subdue Putin’s forces https://ajedrezenmexico.org/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/ukrainian-army-of-chess-players-take-up-arms-to-subdue-putins-forces/ Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972. Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is […]]]>

Bobby Fischer believed that every game of chess was a war on the board. The American went to war against Russia and triumphed by defeating one of its best grandmasters, Boris Spassky, for the World Chess Championship in 1972.

Fifty years later, a battery of Ukrainian chess players is waging war. Only their war is more real. They too are facing the Russians, but not overboard.

Ukrainian chess players are resisting Vladimir Putin’s continued invasion of their country. Some have taken up arms to defend their homeland.

Grandmaster and captain of the Ukrainian national team, Oleksander Sulypa, waits behind a trench in the western city of Lviv, holding a rifle to confront the Russian army.

“I defend my land against enemies and ‘peacekeepers’. The truth will prevail!” he posted a week ago.

GM Georgy Timoshenko. Photo: Facebook/ @juliatimoshenko


A day later, another GM Georgy Timoshenko carried a rifle into battle.

“Yura (Georgy) went to defend the capital (kyiv) with guns in hand,” writes his partner Julia.

At 56, Timoshenko is probably the oldest professional chess player to enter this battlefield.

Aspiring Indian players may remember him as an unassuming grandfather coach, who ran chess camps in Odisha, Gujarat and several other Indian cities a few years ago.

GM Natalia Zhukova

GM Natalia Zhukova with Ukrainian fighters in Odessa. Photo: Facebook/ @nataliazhukova


Meanwhile, former European champion Natalia Zhukova proudly attends the city of Odessa in the southeast of the country, where she is now a member of the city council.

“From morning to evening, with like-minded people, we search for all the necessary things, medicines, etc. Zhukova wrote on Facebook.

General Manager Pavel Eljanov reported that General Manager Igor Kovalenko “is actively volunteering in Kyiv and helping his brothers who have taken up arms.”

An unshaven and gloomy Kovalenko was last heard asking for help on his YouTube channel.

Eljanov, currently Ukraine’s second-best active player, posted on Facebook that his family was in Khrakiv, an eastern city closer to Russia that was ravaged by the onslaught.

He would be safe somewhere.

Teenage sensation Kirill Shevchenko, from Kyiv, is also hopefully not in danger.

He has been busy on social networks to inform the world of the tragic situation prevailing in his country.

Former world champion Anna Muzychuk has reached out to the chess community, especially her colleagues from Russia and Belarus, asking them to explain their position.

The Ukrainian Chess Federation documented the war from the perspective of its members. The other day he mentioned a war casualty.

“On March 2, 2022, after serious injuries caused by the Russian occupiers, FIDE arbiter and children’s coach Oleksiy Valentynovych Druzhynets died (Tokmak, Zaporizhia Oblast, January 3, 1975 – March 2, 2022),” the report said. federation.

Almost all of the Ukrainian players, except one, fought off the Russian attacks in one way or another.

The strange, Super GM Sergey Karjakin has been singled out, not only by Ukrainian players but by the peaceful international chess community as a whole.

What did you write? What are you advocating? asked a shocked Zhukova, after Karjakin rallied to Vladimir Putin.

Karjakin, former world No. the peace !”

Ukraine is the country where Karjakin was born, learned to play chess and his family still lives.

After representing his native country throughout his teenage years, Karjakin, now 32, moved to Russia.

He has since become a strong supporter of Putin.

While Karjakin awaits the verdict of the FIDE Ethics Committee, Ukrainian chess players remain on the frontlines.

Because, as former world champion Garry Kasparov said, condemning the Russian invasion: “It’s not a game of chess. There’s no draw, no stalemate. “

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The opponents of the chess club “P(A)WNS” in the season of success https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-opponents-of-the-chess-club-pawns-in-the-season-of-success/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 06:37:59 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/the-opponents-of-the-chess-club-pawns-in-the-season-of-success/ While the Chicago winter is just freezing cold for most, the University of Chicago Chess Club kept warm in the heat of competition and paved the way for victory in its wake. From the frosty final weeks of the fall term to the surprisingly sunny February outing, the team has fought its way to the […]]]>

While the Chicago winter is just freezing cold for most, the University of Chicago Chess Club kept warm in the heat of competition and paved the way for victory in its wake. From the frosty final weeks of the fall term to the surprisingly sunny February outing, the team has fought its way to the top ranks in competitions ranging from the Fall Collegiate Chess League (CCL) to the Pan-American Intercollegiate Chess Championship through the US Amateur Team-North event. .

Winter also brought the return of William Graif. The former president of the Chess Club had spent the entire fall term playing chess around the world. He expressed sheepish joy exchanging Zoom calls from the Chess Club at 3:30 a.m. – a necessary consequence of Budapest time – for the team’s familiar playgrounds at Hutchinson Commons.

Plus, returning to campus with another honor and a new title never fails to start the competitive season off on the right foot.

“It’s been a whirlwind,” Graif said. “I achieved what I wanted to achieve abroad, in particular to be named FIDE [International Chess Federation] Master. Then I traveled to Europe for a while with my girlfriend, visited New York for a bit before going to Virginia, and straight from Virginia to Chicago.

Graif’s personal success in his chess journey mirrors that of his team; the fall saw UChicago Chess being named the 2021 CCL Fall Champion, along with the top prize of $5,000. The online tournament, which began as a small group of colleges competing against each other, has grown into an attraction catching the attention of chess players and fans alike.

“Our biggest success of the year so far has undoubtedly been the CCL,” said Grandmaster and current Chess Club President Praveen Balakrishnan. “We were the underdogs coming in, facing colleges around the world, some of them known to recruit grandmasters from around the world to play specifically for their college. So it was a really special experience.

Balakrishnan’s words underlined the magnitude of the club’s victory. The team opened the CCL playoffs with a 9.5–6.5 upset against the University of Missouri. Graif echoed Balakrishnan’s fear of victory.

“In the quarter-finals, honestly, I think we even surprised ourselves,” Graif said. “And the finals were extremely close. We were related [with the University of Warsaw] 6–6 going into the final round, and we literally all won our very last games to make that final score 10–6.

Graif went on to point out that the team’s success could not have been achieved without the support and guidance of third-year chess club vice-president Stephen Eisenhauer, who served as both organizer and captain of the chess club. team at CCL. Dividing his time between the team and the pursuit of computer AB/SM, Eisenhauer, like many Chess Club members, remembers his early days in chess as a source of connection to his loved ones, which has turned into a driving force to find its community on the University campus.

“I started playing chess ten years ago because a lot of my older brother’s friends were chess players,” Eisenhauer said. “I basically just followed him to a chess club he went to when he was a kid – he didn’t hang on to it, but I really enjoyed it.”

After winning the CCL, the team competed in the 2022 Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships, where the club received praise and compliments from rival universities for its tenacity and dedication to the game.

“We had coaches at [chess] scholarship universities praising us for our program and for our efforts to be there to compete alongside them,” said Graif. “It was incredibly flattering, and the whole experience was so much fun that I thought, ‘Even though this is the last college chess game I’m playing, I’m happy.'”

And while the UChicago A team was three points from last place in the Final Four, Balakrishnan highlighted the truly inspiring experience of being able to observe the team at their first in-person team event since the start of the pandemic. .

“Before the rounds started, we would all gather in one of the members’ rooms, pull out our laptops and prepare as a team,” Balakrishnan said. “If we needed help with a certain opening, we could ask anyone in the room, but usually everyone had advice to share. It was a big change from the virtual environment.

Most recently, the Chess Club sent two teams to compete at the US Amateur Team-North (USAT) event in Schaumburg, IL from February 18-20. UChicago swept the competition, with UChicago B, consisting of Balakrishnan, Graif, Brian Hu, and the campus’ newest grandmaster, freshman Awonder Liang, taking first place, and UChicago A narrowly in third place, leading by Kapil Chandran, Christoph Eichinger, Dylan Sunjic and Oliver Heggli-Nonay. The team also won the tournament’s first varsity prize, so UChicago B will travel to the USAT Nationals at an undetermined date.

With the spring term fast approaching, Balakrishnan jokingly feigned nerves about taking on the CCL’s second season as returning champions.

“We have more pressure this year because we won last time! Balakrishnan said.

As the club continues to prepare for its next game, Graif highlighted how the string of success is indeed a testament to the growth of the club and the bond shared among its members.

“In my first year, three people came to the club. And so to now have about 20 students enrolled at CCA alone, with all very invested in each other’s play, all eager to help each other out, is just great,” Graif said. “It was truly an honor and a privilege to compete with the teammates I have.”

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Stevensville Chess Club Hosts MCA Tournament March 5 | Local News https://ajedrezenmexico.org/stevensville-chess-club-hosts-mca-tournament-march-5-local-news/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/stevensville-chess-club-hosts-mca-tournament-march-5-local-news/ Ravalli Republic Stevensville Schools and the Montana Chess Association will host a chess tournament on Saturday, March 5 for grades 1-12 to give beginner and intermediate chess players a chance to have fun, compete for prizes and exercise their mental skills. This is the fourth annual tournament that welcomes chess players from all over western […]]]>

Ravalli Republic

Stevensville Schools and the Montana Chess Association will host a chess tournament on Saturday, March 5 for grades 1-12 to give beginner and intermediate chess players a chance to have fun, compete for prizes and exercise their mental skills.

This is the fourth annual tournament that welcomes chess players from all over western Montana.

Organizer Eric Walthall said the tournament is an ideal way for students to try out a chess tournament. “If you know how the pieces move and the basic rules, you can play,” Walthall said.

The tournament will take place in the school’s multipurpose room in Stevensville and registration will begin at 9 a.m.

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Students are divided into three groups based on their age and ability. All students will play five rounds, gaining results by facing tougher opponents in the next round and losing a match means playing against opponents closer to your ability.

“New elementary school players won’t be playing with 12th graders,” Walthall said. “The best players normally compete in the top division, regardless of age and level.”

The current Montana High School State Champion, a former Montana State Champion, and the director of Montana Youth Chess will assist in the tournament.

The awards ceremony is expected to end at 1:30 p.m.

Players are encouraged to bring a bag lunch and snacks are not provided. There is more information online at http://www.montanachess.org/2020/01/22/calendar/

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Stevensville Scholastic Chess Club Hosts MCA Tournament March 5 | Local News https://ajedrezenmexico.org/stevensville-scholastic-chess-club-hosts-mca-tournament-march-5-local-news/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/stevensville-scholastic-chess-club-hosts-mca-tournament-march-5-local-news/ Stevensville Schools and the Montana Chess Association will host a Chess Tournament on Saturday, March 5 for grades 1-12 to give beginning and intermediate chess players a chance to have fun, compete for prizes and exercise their mental skills. This is the fourth annual tournament that welcomes chess players from across western Montana. Organizer Eric […]]]>

Stevensville Schools and the Montana Chess Association will host a Chess Tournament on Saturday, March 5 for grades 1-12 to give beginning and intermediate chess players a chance to have fun, compete for prizes and exercise their mental skills.

This is the fourth annual tournament that welcomes chess players from across western Montana.

Organizer Eric Walthall said the tournament is an ideal way for students to try out a chess tournament. “If you know how the pieces move and the basic rules, you can play,” Walthall said.

The tournament will take place at the school’s multipurpose hall in Stevensville and registration will begin at 9 a.m.

Students are divided into three groups based on their age and ability. All students will play five rounds, gaining results by facing tougher opponents in the next round and losing a match means playing against opponents closer to your ability.

“New elementary school players won’t be playing with 12th graders,” Walthall said. “The best players normally compete in the top division, regardless of age and level.”

The current Montana High School State Champion, a former Montana State Champion, and the director of Montana Youth Chess will assist in the tournament.

The awards ceremony is expected to end at 1:30 p.m.

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FIDE suspends chess tournaments in Russia, expressing ‘serious concern’ over Ukraine invasion https://ajedrezenmexico.org/fide-suspends-chess-tournaments-in-russia-expressing-serious-concern-over-ukraine-invasion/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 14:49:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/fide-suspends-chess-tournaments-in-russia-expressing-serious-concern-over-ukraine-invasion/ “There is always huge popular enthusiasm for the game when important matches and tournaments are going on,” said Michael Hudson, an associate professor at the American University of Phnom Penh in Cambodia, who wrote his thesis on chess in Soviet Union. “They always get the headlines.” But the international chess organization this week dealt a […]]]>

“There is always huge popular enthusiasm for the game when important matches and tournaments are going on,” said Michael Hudson, an associate professor at the American University of Phnom Penh in Cambodia, who wrote his thesis on chess in Soviet Union. “They always get the headlines.”

But the international chess organization this week dealt a blow to Russia, where the game is historically embedded in the country’s national identity. In response to Ukraine’s invasion, the International Chess Federation on Sunday withdrew tournaments from Russia and Belarus, a move experts said was historic.

“FIDE expresses its deep concern over the military action launched by Russia in Ukraine,” the organization, using its French acronym, said in a statement. “FIDE is united against wars and condemns any use of military means to resolve political disputes.”

As well as drawing tournaments – including the prestigious Chess Olympiad – FIDE has also said Russian and Belarusian players will not be allowed to display their flags in tournaments and the federation will end all sponsorship deals. which it holds with Russian and Belarusian public companies. He also said that two Russian players who publicly expressed their support for the invasion could be sanctioned.

“We were convinced that we had to act,” FIDE vice-president and British grandmaster Nigel Short told The Washington Post.

“This is an outright act of aggression against a sovereign country, and … it involves two very important chess nations,” he added, referring to Russia and Ukraine. . “I mean, they are two of the strongest chess nations in the world.”

In the days leading up to Sunday’s announcement, critics had questioned whether the organization would take a tough stance on Russia. Ben Finegold, an American grandmaster, was one of them.

Following FIDE’s announcement to withdraw the Chess Olympiad and suspend other tournaments, Finegold told the Post that the organization’s decision is “unprecedented” as it has traditionally moved away from the Politics. It was also a “pleasant surprise” because FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich is Russian.

“The Olympiad is a huge event, so taking it away is a real ‘sanction’ against Russia,” Finegold said.

The measures “could make Russia [grandmasters] even more angry with [President Vladimir] Putin,” he added, “and could cause some to rethink the country they represent.”

FIDE, on the other hand, did not ban Russians from participating in tournaments. When asked if FIDE could impose more restrictions, Short said the organization had been “very widely praised for the actions it has already taken – even from its perennial critics.”

“But whether our substantive decisions have gone far enough is another matter,” he said. “It’s something we’re looking at.”

Sports sanctions can pose “moral opprobrium” that could also undermine Russian citizens’ trust in Putin, said Steven Fish, a political science professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

Putin’s justification for invading Ukraine “being increasingly difficult to support with ordinary Russians when they see apolitical international sports organizations … locking down their country,” Fish told the Post.

Fish added that international sporting events, including the Chess Olympiad, are extremely important to Russians. Putin has worked to boost Russia’s global prestige by hosting events such as the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and the 2018 World Cup, he said.

“Chess certainly has a big part in the imagination of Russians, and they take pride in the fact that they have grandmasters and tend to do well in these competitions,” Fish said. “And that, like football, is a beloved sport in Russia, and they’re going to take being excluded from it very seriously.”

As of October 2020, there were 1,722 grandmasters in the world, according to FIDE, and Russia was home to 239. Germany, the country with the second highest number of grandmasters, had 96, followed by the states United with 95.

While Russia’s relationship with chess dates back centuries, it was during the Soviet era that the game became widespread, said Hudson, a professor in Cambodia.

“Chess has this very important ideological component, right from the start,” Hudson said. “Chess was never about chess in the Soviet Union. Chess was about politics.

Vladimir Lenin and other Bolsheviks were avid chess players, Hudson said, and Soviet leaders believed the 1917 Russian Revolution “came too soon”. Therefore, they sought to prepare the proletariat for its “historic mission” to achieve a socialist society, Hudson said: “It was decided that chess would be one of the ways to achieve this.”

In the 1920s, a “chess fever” gripped the Soviet Union as the government sponsored programs and established chess clubs from Moscow to the Siberian countryside, wrote Russian FIDE master Andrey Terekhov in a essay published on Chess24.com, a chess platform and publication. . The game was still present in factories, cafeterias and schools, according to Hudson.

Chess later became a way for the Soviets to exercise international power – to demonstrate the “superiority of the Soviet system,Hudson said, and Russia came to “dominate” FIDE.

The Soviet Union and Russia quickly produced some of the most famous and successful grandmasters, including Kasparov, Karpov and Mikhail Botvinnik. In the second half of the 20th century, players from the Soviet Union and Russia won all but one of the world chess championships.

FIDE’s connection with Russia continued after the fall of the regime, Wired reported. For 23 years from 1995, Russian businessman and politician Kirsan Ilyumzhinov served as the organization’s chairman. He was accused of being close to the Kremlin, which he denied, as reported by FiveThirtyEight. In 2015, the US Treasury Department sanctioned Ilyumzhinov for providing financial support to the Syrian government.

“We’ve been dominated by Russia, at least politically, for a long time,” FIDE official Short told The Post.

Dvorkovich, who previously worked for the Russian government, is now the organization’s chairman. But Short credited Dvorkovich with helping usher in organizational change. He said FIDE’s ability to pull tournaments out of Russia and cut sponsorships from its state-owned companies “shows things are changing.”.”

Short stressed the importance of cutting sponsorships.

“A few years ago FIDE couldn’t have done it because they couldn’t afford it,” he said. But now, “we get our money from different sources, from many different countries around the world.

Hudson agreed that FIDE’s most recent actions signal a change in sentiment.

“This whole thing with the withdrawal of FIDE from Russia would have been unthinkable in Soviet times because FIDE was really controlled by the Soviet Union,” Hudson said.

In the last World Chess Championship held in Dubai at the end of 2021, Russian grandmaster Ian Nepomniachtchi was beaten by Norwegian grandmaster Magnus Carlsen, the defending champion.

Carlsen publicly opposed Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, tweeted last week: “Peace is cool. War – not so much.

Nepomniashchi tweeted in Russian: “I fear that the price of the madness of the last days is unimaginable and exorbitant.”

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Chess players compete in person for the first time this season https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-players-compete-in-person-for-the-first-time-this-season/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 01:21:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-players-compete-in-person-for-the-first-time-this-season/ ROCHESTER, Minn. (KTTC) – 40 high school and college chess players put their skills to the test today at the Rochester Area Scholastic Chess League City Cup Tournament. Teams from Lourdes, Byron, Century and Mayo met at Mayo High School to play in person for the first time this season. Each varsity team consists of […]]]>

ROCHESTER, Minn. (KTTC) – 40 high school and college chess players put their skills to the test today at the Rochester Area Scholastic Chess League City Cup Tournament.

Teams from Lourdes, Byron, Century and Mayo met at Mayo High School to play in person for the first time this season.

Each varsity team consists of five players who are awarded a point for a win or a half point for a tie which determines the team’s score.

The championship match was between Century and Byron who were tied 2.5–2.5 and were scheduled to enter a 10-minute round of rapid chess.

In the end, Century won their 12th City Cup in program history.

Century coach and Rochester Area Scholastic Chess League secretary Chuck Handlon says chess is more than a board game for his players.

“Be part of the camaraderie of a team. There is a link there. They learn social skills. They also learn critical thinking skills. How to think beyond a single move and how to analyze and plan,” Handlon said.

Lourdes player Dylan Park has been playing chess for many years. He was actually taught by his uncle who is a great master. Being only a sixth grader, he has plenty of time to achieve his chess goals in his career.

” Better and better. Try to focus more on each play, take some time to look at each play, goof less and less and win more and more games,” Dylan said.

The Minnesota State Chess Tournament will be held March 12-13. It’s an open tournament, so any player can register to play.

Copyright 2022 KTTC. All rights reserved.

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Chess players take part in the 22nd annual City Cup tournament | News https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-players-take-part-in-the-22nd-annual-city-cup-tournament-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://ajedrezenmexico.org/chess-players-take-part-in-the-22nd-annual-city-cup-tournament-news/ ROCHESTER, Minnesota — Chess players of all skill levels put their skills to the test today in the City Cup tournament. This is part of the 2022 school chess season. Students from primary to high school came to compete on Saturday in this chess tournament. Over 30 students participated in the event, including Sam Blocksome […]]]>

ROCHESTER, Minnesota — Chess players of all skill levels put their skills to the test today in the City Cup tournament. This is part of the 2022 school chess season.

Students from primary to high school came to compete on Saturday in this chess tournament. Over 30 students participated in the event, including Sam Blocksome who was crowned the winner of one of the games.

“It was a good game and I really feel like I won it late in the game,” Blocksome said.

Other players, including Ryder Selnes, have been playing the game since kindergarten and continue to learn new skills with each game.

“I like chess because it’s fun and it broadens my knowledge,” says Selnes.

“Players range from college to junior and alternate college which is not as competitive as others. Although it is a competition, the tournament aims to improve the mental abilities of each raised.

“It also improves critical thinking skills and social skills,” the Rochester-area school chess secretary told KIMT News 3. “We’re here to have fun, so take your pick.”

The season is not over yet. Next month, teams from Lourdes, Byron, Century and Mayo High School will compete in the state tournament.

The state tournament will conclude the 2022 school chess season. It will take place on March 12-13.

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